Sunday shows - Infrastructure, Jan. 6 commission dominate

Sunday shows - Infrastructure, Jan. 6 commission dominate
© Getty Images

Infrastructure and a 9/11-style commission to investigate the deadly Jan. 6 siege on the U.S. Capitol dominated the Sunday morning political shows. 

White House officials last Friday presented a $1.7 trillion counterproposal to Republicans in pursuit of a bipartisan deal on infrastructure, reducing the price tag of President BidenJoe BidenBiden authorizes up to 0M for Afghan refugees Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe MORE’s infrastructure proposal by $550 billion.

Two days earlier, the House passed a bill to establish a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, earning relatively little support from Republicans as GOP leaders sought to quash a bill negotiated by one of their own members.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below. 

Biden adviser: Infrastructure counterproposal shows 'willingness to negotiate in good faith'
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
Cedric RichmondCedric RichmondCritical race theory becomes focus of midterms Democrats look to flip script on GOP 'defund the police' attacks Voting rights advocates eager for Biden to use bully pulpit MORE, a senior adviser to President Biden, said the administration’s counterproposal on infrastructure illustrates a “willingness to negotiate in good faith.”

When asked by host Dana BashDana BashKey Biden ally OK with dropping transit from infrastructure package Klobuchar: If Breyer is going to retire from Supreme Court, it should be sooner rather than later Sunday shows - Surgeon general in the spotlight as delta variant spreads MORE on CNN’s "State of the Union" if Biden is willing to “narrow his plans and his scope even further” to land a bipartisan deal on infrastructure, Richmond highlighted the administration’s counterproposal, which decreased their initial plan by $550 billion.

“The president coming down $550 billion off of his initial proposal I think shows the willingness to negotiate in good faith and in a serious manner. And the real question is whether the Republicans will meet the effort that the president is showing," Richmond said.
Read the full story here
 
 
Collins notes 'fundamental differences' on Biden's infrastructure plan
By OLAFIMIHAN OSHIN 
 
Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTransit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal The Hill's Morning Report - Infrastructure vote fails; partisan feud erupts over Jan. 6 panel Senate falling behind on infrastructure MORE (R-Maine) said on Sunday that Republicans and Democrats have “fundamental differences” when it comes to President Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure plan. 
Read the full story here
 
 
Roy Blunt: 'Too early' to create commission to investigate Jan. 6
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
"I think it's too early to create a commission, and I believe Republicans in the Senate will decide that it's too early to create that commission," Senior Missouri Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThe Hill's Morning Report - Will Schumer back down on his deadline? GOP fumes over Schumer hardball strategy Cybersecurity bills gain new urgency after rash of attacks MORE (R) told "Fox News Sunday" host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceAides who clashed with Giuliani intentionally gave him wrong time for Trump debate prep: book GOP says Schumer vote will fail The Hill's Morning Report - Surging COVID-19 infections loom over US, Olympics MORE. "Commissions often don't work at all and when they do work, like the Simpson-Bowles commission, produced a good result, nothing happened as part of that result."
Read the full story here
 
 
Former GOP senator says Jan. 6 commission 'should be a no brainer"
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL 
 
“To me it's a no brainer. You look what happened in 9/11, and we were attacked by foreign terrorists, and we wanted to find out immediately, where was the breakdown, what happened and why. Well this is no different,” former Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) told host Dana Bash on CNN’s “State of the Union.”
Read the full story here
 
 
Kinzinger: Jan. 6 will impact 2022 midterms if 'Republicans don't take ownership for what happened'
By JOSEPH CHOI 
 
Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerKey Biden ally OK with dropping transit from infrastructure package The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panel Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe, eyeing new GOP reinforcements MORE (R-Ill.) said on Sunday that regardless of whether or not an independent commission is created to investigate the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol, the riot l will impact the 2022 midterms "particularly if us as Republicans don't take ownership for what happened."
Read the full story here
 
 
Former Defense secretary: No Republican president I worked for would recognize GOP today
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Robert Gates, former Defense secretary under both the George W. Bush and Obama administrations, said in an interview aired on Sunday that of the five Republican U.S. presidents he worked for, "I don't think any of them would recognize the Republican Party today."
Read the full story here
 
 
Blinken warns of 'grave' humanitarian situation in Gaza
By OLAFIMIHAN OSHIN 
 
"It was critical to get to the ceasefire, and President Biden's focus on relentless, determined, but quiet diplomacy is what got us to where we needed to be, which is to get the violence ended as quickly as possible, to stop more human suffering and to at least put ourselves in position to make a turn to make a pivot to building something more positive, that has to start now with dealing with the grave humanitarian situation in Gaza,” Secretary of State Antony BlinkenAntony BlinkenBlinken to travel to India, Kuwait next week Biden announces delegation to attend Haitian president's funeral House bill targets US passport backlog MORE said.
Read the full story here
 
 
Sanders: US must bring people together instead of 'supplying weapons to kill children'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Progressive Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Overnight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia US launches second Somalia strike in week MORE (I-Vt.) on Sunday called for an "even-handed approach" to the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians and said the U.S. must lead the world in bringing people together instead of "supplying weapons to kill children."
Read the full story here
 
 
Rand Paul: 'I'm not getting vaccinated'
By JORDAN WILLIAMS
 
“Until they show me evidence that people who have already had the infection are dying in large numbers, or being hospitalized or getting very sick, I just made my own personal decision that I’m not getting vaccinated because I’ve already had the disease and I have natural immunity,” Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP Rep. Cawthorn says he wants to 'prosecute' Fauci Writer: Fauci, Paul clash shouldn't distract from probe into COVID-19 origins S.E. Cupp: 'The politicization of science and health safety has inarguably cost lives' MORE (R-Ky.) said.
Read the full story here
 
 
GOP lawmaker: Greene's comments comparing mask policy to Holocaust is 'beyond reprehensible'
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL 
 
Republican Rep. Peter MeijerPeter MeijerMichigan GOP executive director quits under pressure from Trump allies Cheney, Kinzinger are sole GOP votes for Jan. 6 select committee White House backs repeal of 2002 war authorization MORE (Mich.) denounced comments made by fellow GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor GreeneMarjorie Taylor GreeneGOP efforts to downplay danger of Capitol riot increase The Memo: What now for anti-Trump Republicans? Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene says she's meeting with Trump 'soon' in Florida MORE (Ga.) who compared the mask policy on the House floor to the Holocaust, calling them “beyond reprehensible.”
Read the full story here
 
 
Booker on police reform negotiations: 'We're making meaningful progress'
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerJD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Democrats criticize FBI's handling of tip line in Kavanaugh investigation MORE (R-N.J.) on Sunday said lawmakers are “making meaningful progress” in police reform negotiations, adding that he remains focused on eliminating qualified immunity.
Read the full story here