House Republican says DOJ should investigate Jan. 6, not 'politically appointed' commission

Texas Republican Rep. Michael McCaulMichael Thomas McCaulGOP report on COVID-19 origins homes in on lab leak theory Afghan evacuees to be housed at Virginia base Passport backlog threatens to upend travel plans for millions of Americans MORE on Sunday defended his vote against legislation to create a commission to probe the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, arguing that the Department of Justice (DOJ) should investigate the insurrection and not a “politically appointed” commission.

When asked by host Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperManchin on reported boos at Democratic luncheon: 'I heard a lot of nos' Ocasio-Cortez: 'More than enough' votes to prevent infrastructure from passing without reconciliation bill Ohio governor says vaccine lottery was successful MORE on CNN’s “State of the Union” why he voted against the creation of an independent commission to investigate the Capitol breach by supporters of former President TrumpDonald TrumpSenators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session Gosar's siblings pen op-ed urging for his resignation: 'You are immune to shame' Sunday shows - Delta variant, infrastructure dominate MORE, McCaul said Congress should instead wait for the DOJ to complete its criminal investigation, which he said would not be “tainted by politics.”

“I view this not as an overview of policy, like the 9/11 Commission did. It's a criminal investigation, a criminal case. In my judgment, that properly falls within the purview of the Department of Justice, where I worked for many years, rather than a politically appointed, you know, commission,” McCaul said.

McCaul, a former federal prosecutor, said that once the DOJ completes its investigation, the findings should be delivered to Congress.

“Let's let this DOJ investigation go forward. They've arrested over 400 people now responsible. I want those responsible to be held accountable and put behind bars, and I want all the answers as to what happened on Jan. 6, and then report it to Congress,” McCaul said.

“Congress should have a full report of this DOJ investigation that I don't believe will be tainted by politics, whereas some other methods could be. I think the DOJ, having been a part of that for so long, really is where this properly should be to get to the bottom of what happened and then really get to prosecuting and putting these people behind bars,” he added.

Senate Republicans on Friday blocked the passage of a bill that aimed to create an independent commission to probe the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol in a 54-35 vote.

Six GOP senators crossed party lines and voted for the commission: Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiBill would honor Ginsburg, O'Connor with statues at Capitol The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators MORE (Alaska), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySenators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators MORE (Utah), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSchumer: Democrats 'on track' to pass bipartisan deal, .5T budget Sunday shows - Delta variant, infrastructure dominate Collins says negotiators are 'just about finished' with infrastructure bill MORE (Maine), Bill CassidyBill CassidySenators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session Optimism grows that infrastructure deal will get to Biden's desk Biden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet MORE (La.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session Optimism grows that infrastructure deal will get to Biden's desk Biden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet MORE (Ohio) and Ben SasseBen SasseSasse calls China's Xi a 'coward' after Apple Daily arrest Defunct newspaper's senior editor arrested in Hong Kong Murkowski: Trump has 'threatened to do a lot' to those who stand up to him MORE (Neb.).

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (R-Pa.) missed the vote because of a family commitment, but a spokesperson from his office said he would have supported the legislation “with the expectation that the Senate would consider and Sen. Toomey would have supported” GOP amendments.

Even with Toomey’s support, however, the bill still lacked the 10 GOP Senators needed to pass.

The bill cleared the House in a 252-175 vote earlier this month, with 35 Republicans supporting the legislation.

According to the DOJ, the department has arrested and charged more than 440 people for their roles in the Capitol attack.