Toomey: Jan. 6 investigation 'is politically to the advantage of Democrats'

Republican Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.) said on Sunday that investigations into the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol are “politically to the advantage of Democrats to try to keep this issue in the forefront.”

“We have a lot of investigations underway now. There are Senate committees that have completed some. There are others still in progress. We have many criminal investigations. I would favor a truly bipartisan commission, but I think there — we should be candid about the fact that it is politically to the advantage of Democrats to try to keep this issue in the forefront,” Toomey told host Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperFrederica Wilson rails against Haitian deportation flights, calls treatment 'inhumane' WHIP LIST: How House Democrats say they'll vote on infrastructure bill Yarmuth and Clyburn suggest .5T package may be slimmed MORE on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

Toomey cited remarks from James Carville, contending that the Democratic strategist has “urged the Democrats, don't let the election be about Joe BidenJoe BidenHaiti prime minister warns inequality will cause migration to continue Pelosi: House must pass 3 major pieces of spending legislation this week Erdoğan says Turkey plans to buy another Russian defense system MORE and his policies in 2022; make that election about Jan. 6 and Donald Trump.”

“So it's very clear that Democrats have an incentive to try to drive a political message here and a purely partisan commission in the House. It's probably gonna do that,” Toomey added.

Republicans labeled the select committee to probe the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol as partisan after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi: House must pass 3 major pieces of spending legislation this week Sunday shows preview: Pelosi announces date for infrastructure vote; administration defends immigration policies GOP should grab the chance to upend Pelosi's plan on reconciliation MORE (D-Calif.) last week rejected two of the five Republican nominees to the panel: Reps. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanAllies see rising prospect of Trump 2024 White House bid Republican leaders misjudged Jan. 6 committee Watchdog group seeks ethics probe over McCarthy's Jan. 6 comments MORE (Ohio) and Jim Banks (Ill.), both of whom are staunch supporters of former President TrumpDonald TrumpGraham says he hopes that Trump runs again Trump says Stacey Abrams 'might be better than existing governor' Kemp Executive privilege fight poses hurdles for Trump MORE.

Pelosi on Sunday defended her decision to turn down the nominees, saying in an interview that the two lawmakers “are people who would jeopardize the integrity of the investigation, and there’s no way I would tolerate their antics.”

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats argue price before policy amid scramble Fifth House Republican comes out in support of bipartisan infrastructure bill Watch live: McCarthy holds briefing with reporters MORE (R-Calif.) responded to the Speaker’s move by pulling all five of his nominees, leaving Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyThe Memo: Trump's Arizona embarrassment sharpens questions for GOP House passes sweeping defense policy bill Trump rips Bush for backing Cheney MORE (Wyo.) as the sole Republican on the panel.

On Sunday, however, Pelosi signaled that she will likely appoint Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerThe Memo: Trump's Arizona embarrassment sharpens questions for GOP The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats argue price before policy amid scramble Fifth House Republican comes out in support of bipartisan infrastructure bill MORE (R-Ill.) to the committee, saying in an interview, “You could say that’s the direction I would be going.”

Cheney and Kinzinger are two of the 10 GOP House members who voted to impeach Trump for a second time in January.