Sunday shows - Biden domestic agenda, Texas abortion law dominate

Sunday shows - Biden domestic agenda, Texas abortion law dominate
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A top aide to President BidenJoe BidenHow 'Buy American', other pro-US policies can help advocates pass ambitious climate policies Overnight Defense & National Security — Presented by Raytheon Technologies — Biden backtracks on Taiwan Photos of the Week: Manchin protestor, Paris Hilton and a mirror room MORE said on Sunday that officials are moving "full steam ahead" on a $3.5 trillion spending package, despite comments from Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinHow 'Buy American', other pro-US policies can help advocates pass ambitious climate policies Photos of the Week: Manchin protestor, Paris Hilton and a mirror room Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by the American Petroleum Institute — Biden seeks to quell concerns over climate proposals MORE (D-W.Va.) that he can't support the initiative. 

Multiple guests on the morning political talk shows also discussed a new law that went into effect last week restricting abortion in Texas.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Biden adviser: 'Full steam ahead' on $3.5T spending package despite Manchin warning
By DOMINICK MASTRANGELO
 
White House senior adviser Cedric RichmondCedric RichmondBiden to meet with business leaders amid debt ceiling pressure campaign on GOP Bottom line The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden, Democrats to scale back agenda MORE said on Sunday that President Biden's administration will push ahead with its pursuit of a proposed $3.5 trillion spending package despite recent hesitations voiced by a key moderate Democrat in the Senate. 

"Senator Manchin is a valued partner. We're going to continue to work with him," Richmond said during an appearance on ABC's "This Week" when asked about a warning from Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) that he would not support the package.

"But we're also going to continue to push our agenda. And part of this ... is just the sausage-making process at the end. It just happens. And this is happening in public view," Richmond added. "But it's not abnormal for this to happen in the legislative process. And we're still full steam ahead on trying to get our legislation passed."
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Top Biden aide: Administration will find ways to protect constitutional rights of women in Texas
By CAROLINE VAKIL 
 
White House chief of staff Ron KlainRon KlainOvernight Defense & National Security — Presented by Raytheon Technologies — Biden backtracks on Taiwan Nearly 200 Americans want to leave Afghanistan, State Department tells Congress Neera Tanden tapped as White House staff secretary MORE said on Sunday that the Biden administration is going to find ways to protect the constitutional rights of women in Texas after the Supreme Court declined to block an abortion law that went into effect in the state last week.
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Texas Democrat says 'deadly consequences' will come from state's abortion bill
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
Rep. Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Build Back Better items on chopping block Progressives say go big and make life hard for GOP Three Democrats call for investigation into Sidney Powell to move 'swiftly' MORE (D-Texas) on Sunday said there will be “deadly consequences” from the abortion bill that went into effect in her home state last week, which bans abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancies.
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Kinzinger knocks Texas abortion law component that allows people to 'tattle'
By CAROLINE VAKIL
 
Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerThe 9 Republicans who voted to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress Cheney reveals GOP's Banks claimed he was Jan. 6 panel's ranking member House votes to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress MORE (R-Ill.) said on Sunday that while he is personally opposed to abortion, he dislikes a component of a recently enacted Texas law that allows private citizens to “tattle” on each other to enforce the legislation.
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Klobuchar: Senate needs to eliminate filibuster to protect abortion rights
By CAROLINE VAKIL
 
Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharGOP blocks Senate Democrats' revised elections bill Progressives push back on decision to shrink Biden's paid family leave program The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Altria - Biden holds meetings to resurrect his spending plan MORE (D-Minn.) said on Sunday that the Senate should eliminate the filibuster in order to protect women’s abortion rights after the Supreme Court last week declined to block a Texas law that bans abortion after six weeks of pregnancy.
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Top GOP lawmaker says Taliban won't let Americans leave from Afghanistan airport
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL 
 
Rep. Michael McCaulMichael Thomas McCaulPentagon, State Department square off on Afghanistan accountability Mike Siegel: Potential McConaughey candidacy a 'sideshow' in Texas governor race Biden signs bill to help victims of 'Havana syndrome' MORE (R-Texas) said on Sunday that six airplanes carrying American citizens and Afghan allies are sitting at an airport in Afghanistan trying to depart, but that the Taliban is “holding them hostage for demands.”
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McCaul says situation in Afghanistan is 'worse' than pre-9/11 because Taliban has US weapons
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL 
 
Rep. Michael McCaul (Texas), the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, said on Sunday that the situation in Afghanistan is “worse” than before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks because the Taliban is “fully armed” with U.S. weaponry.
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Fauci says Pfizer booster shot likely approved by Sept. 20, Moderna to follow
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
Anthony FauciAnthony FauciFauci says it's recommended to get same vaccine for COVID-19 boosters The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Manchin, Sanders in budget feud; Biden still upbeat Timken rolls out six-figure ad campaign, hits Fauci MORE on Sunday said the Pfizer-BioNTech shot will likely be the only approved COVID-19 vaccine booster by Sept. 20, the date the Biden administration previously recommended for beginning to administer booster shots for all fully-vaccinated individuals.
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Maryland governor: We're getting 'mixed messagings' from Biden administration on boosters
By CAROLINE VAKIL
 
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) said on Sunday that his administration is getting “mixed messagings” from the Biden White House when it comes to COVID-19 booster shots.
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Director of Harvard Global Health Institute says we are 'going to see more variants'
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL 
 
Dr. Ashish Jha, a physician and the director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, said on Sunday that the U.S. and world is “going to see more variants” as the coronavirus spreads.
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FEMA administrator says climate change impacts are 'the crisis of our generation'
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
Deanne Criswell, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), said on Sunday that impacts from climate change are “the crisis of our generation,” after Hurricane Ida slammed southern Louisiana and its remnants killed several people in the northeast amid historic flooding.
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