Sunday shows - All eyes on spending votes

Sunday shows - All eyes on spending votes
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House votes on a bipartisan infrastructure bill and a larger $3.5 trillion spending plan dominated the political talk shows on Sunday morning.

Top Democrats acknowledged that the spending plan, which they hope to pass without support from Republicans, will likely be lower than the $3.5 trillion originally proposed. 

Questions were also raised about whether the House would vote on the bipartisan infrastructure bill on Monday, as initially planned.  

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

Pelosi on $3.5T spending package: It 'seems self-evident' it will be less than proposed
By MONIQUE BEALS
 
Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiJudge to hear Trump's case against Jan. 6 committee in November Kamala Harris engages with heckler during New York speech GOP lawmaker calls for Meghan, Harry to lose royal titles over paid leave push MORE (D-Calif.) said on Sunday that it "seems self-evident" that the final price tag for the Democrats' spending plan would be smaller than $3.5 trillion originally proposed. 

"Yeah that seems self-evident. That seems self-evident" she said on ABC's "This Week" when asked if she would acknowledge that there would be a lower total for the package.
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Booker: 'If we do a $3 trillion bill, a $2.5 trillion bill, I'm going to push for as big and bold as we can'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerSenate Democrats call for diversity among new Federal Reserve Bank presidents Progressives push back on decision to shrink Biden's paid family leave program Emanuel to take hot seat in Senate confirmation hearing MORE (D-N.J.) on Sunday committed to passing "big and bold" measures in the multibillion dollar reconciliation bill as congressional Democratic leaders acknowledge the final price tag will likely be smaller than the proposed $3.5 trillion.
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Pelosi on infrastructure bill: 'I'm never bringing a bill to the floor that doesn't have the votes'
By MONIQUE BEALS
 
"Let me just say we're going to pass the bill this week," Pelosi said.
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Jayapal: 'The votes aren't there' to pass infrastructure bill on Monday
By MONIQUE BEALS
 
"I don't believe there will be a vote," Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalWhich proposals will survive in the Democrats' spending plan? Proposals to reform supports for parents face chopping block Democrats see light at end of tunnel on Biden agenda MORE (D-Wash.) said. "The Speaker is an incredibly good vote counter, and she knows exactly where her caucus stands, and we've been really clear on that." 
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'No reason' why Democrats shouldn't pass infrastructure bill right away, Gottheimer says
By RACHEL SCULLY
 
"These are two separate bills," Rep. Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerModerates split over climate plans in Democrats' spending package Bleak midterm outlook shadows bitter Democratic battle Democrats downplay deadlines on Biden's broad spending plan MORE (D-N.J.)  said. "You've got the infrastructure, a historic once-in-a-century [bill]... There's no reason why we shouldn't pass that right away and get those shovels in the ground."
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DHS secretary says Haitian migrant crisis is 'nothing new'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Alejandro MayorkasAlejandro MayorkasTop officials turn over Twitter accounts to 'share the mic' with Black cybersecurity experts Federal officers detail abuse described by asylum seekers Senate Republicans raise concerns about TSA cyber directives for rail, aviation MORE on Sunday shot back at criticisms of the Biden administration's handling of the Haitian migrant crisis, saying, "this is nothing new."
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We are working in a 'completely broken' immigration system, Mayorkas says
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas on Sunday said that the U.S. is capable of addressing the immigration crisis at the southern border, but acknowledged that "we are working in a completely broken system."
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Abbott promises to hire Border Patrol agents punished by Biden administration
By JOSEPH CHOI 
 
Texas Gov. Greg AbbottGreg AbbottLincoln Project files ethics complaint against Abbott Arizona attorney general asks for restraining order to block federal vaccine mandate Overnight Health Care — Presented by Carequest — Key CDC panel backs Moderna, J&J boosters MORE (R) on Sunday pledged his support for any Border Patrol agents who are punished by the Biden administration, saying he will hire any who are at risk of losing their jobs.
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CDC director: Including people at high risk of exposure to COVID-19 for boosters was 'close call'
By MONIQUE BEALS
 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Rochelle WalenskyRochelle WalenskyOvernight Health Care — Presented by Carequest — Study finds Pfizer vaccine almost 91 percent effective for 5 to 11 year olds Fauci says it's recommended to get same vaccine for COVID-19 boosters Walensky: CDC will 'not articulate a preference' for which booster to get MORE said Sunday that determining eligibility for people at higher risk for COVID-19 because of their workplace environment was a "scientific close call."
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Pfizer CEO calls CDC's booster shot decision 'a very good one'
By MONIQUE BEALS 
 
Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said Sunday he believes the decision by the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC) to first move forward with booster shots for older, more at-risk Americans and frontline workers was "a very good one."
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Tim Scott says police reform talks collapsed with Dems over funding
By CELINE CASTRONUOVO
 
GOP Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottTim Scott takes in .3 million in third quarter Nikki Haley gets lifetime post on Clemson Board of Trustees First senator formally endorses Bass in LA mayoral bid MORE (S.C.) said he believes months-long negotiations with Democratic lawmakers on a potential police reform bill collapsed because their proposals called for reducing funding to law enforcement.
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