Sunday shows - Democrats' spending plan in the spotlight

Sunday shows - Democrats' spending plan in the spotlight
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The Democrats’ spending bill dominated the Sunday morning political shows, with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCongress averts shutdown after vaccine mandate fight On The Money — Congress races to keep the lights on House sets up Senate shutdown showdown MORE saying she thinks "we are pretty much there now" on the scaled-back package.

Democrats are working to determine what aspects of the reconciliation package will remain, be amended or removed as lawmakers seek to come to a resolution over the top-line figure of the package.

Read The Hill's full coverage below.

Pelosi on spending bill: 'I think we are pretty much there now'
By MONIQUE BEALS
 
Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) indicated on Sunday that Democrats would reach an agreement this week on President BidenJoe BidenManchin to vote to nix Biden's vaccine mandate for larger businesses Congress averts shutdown after vaccine mandate fight Senate cuts deal to clear government funding bill MORE's social spending bill.

"We have 90 percent of the bill agreed to and written. We just have some of the last decisions to be made," Pelosi said on CNN's "State of the Union."

"I think we are pretty much there now," Pelosi said when asked if an agreement would be reached before the president leaves for Europe on Friday.
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Khanna expresses frustration about Sinema
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Progressive Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaKhanna advocates for 'honest and reflective patriotism' in America Democrats call on Education secretary to address 'stealthing' at federal level Showdown: Pelosi dares liberals to sink infrastructure bill MORE (D-Calif.) expressed frustration about centrist Sen. Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaBiden should seek some ideological diversity Budowsky: Why GOP donors flock to Manchin and Sinema Pence-linked group launches 0K ad campaign in West Virginia praising Manchin MORE (D-Ariz.) on Sunday for her part in helping stall key Democratic bills from advancing in the Senate and saying that he was frustrated that she refuses to talk about what her positions are.
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Yellen expects inflation to return to normal levels next year
By MONIQUE BEALS 
 
"Inflation will remain high into next year because of what's already happened, but I expect improvement by the middle to end of next year, second half of next year," Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenYellen: Omicron 'could cause significant problems' for global economy Real relief from high gas prices House sets up Senate shutdown showdown MORE said on Sunday.
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CDC director 'encouraged' by dropping COVID-19 cases but says 'we can't be complacent'
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Rochelle WalenskyRochelle WalenskyCDC working to tighten testing requirement for international travelers Overnight Health Care — Presented by March of Dimes — Omicron sets off a flurry of responses CDC strengthens recommendation to say all adults should get booster shot MORE, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said on Sunday that she was "encouraged" by dropping COVID-19 cases across the country but warned "we can't be complacent."
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Fauci says vaccines could be available to kids in early November
By CAROLINE VAKIL
 
Anthony FauciAnthony FauciFauci to appear on Fox Business Friday for rare interview on the network Hawaii reports its first omicron case Glenn Greenwald discusses criticism of Fauci overseeing 'medically unjustifiable' experiments on dogs MORE said on Sunday that COVID-19 vaccines could be available for children in early November, providing a boost of optimism for some parents seeking to get their kids inoculated in time for the holidays.
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Arkansas governor says mandates are increasing vaccine hesitancy
By MONIQUE BEALS
 
Arkansas Gov. Asa HutchinsonAsa HutchinsonDemocratic caucus chairs call for Boebert committee assignment removal Boebert and Omar fight leaves GOP scrambling GOP governor says McCarthy should condemn Boebert's anti-Muslim remarks MORE (R) said on Sunday mandates are increasing hesitancy surrounding COVID-19 vaccines.
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Jan. 6 committee chair: 'No question' Capitol riot was a premeditated attack
By CAROLINE VAKIL
 
Rep. Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonRules committee mulls contempt vote for Trump DOJ official Cheney warns of consequences for Trump in dealings with Jan. 6 committee Jan. 6 panel recommends contempt charges for Trump DOJ official MORE, (D-Miss.), the chairman of the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol, said on Sunday there was “no question” that it was a premeditated attack.
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Independent senator: 'Talking filibuster' or 'alternative' an option
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Sen. Angus KingAngus KingAmazon, Facebook, other large firms would pay more under proposed minimum tax, Warren's office says Senators look to defense bill to move cybersecurity measures Energy information chief blames market for high fuel prices MORE (I-Maine) on Sunday said he is open to keeping some form of the legislative filibuster, proposing a "talking filibuster" or "alternative" as members of the Democratic caucus call for the procedure to be abolished in the upper chamber.
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Pelosi won't say if she'll run for reelection in 2022
By REMA RAHMAN
 
Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Sunday laughed off a question about whether she would run for reelection in 2022, saying she would consult with her family before making her decision public.
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GOP senator: Best thing Trump could do to help Republicans in 2022 is talk about future
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden talks up bright side beneath omicron's cloud GOP fears boomerang as threat of government shutdown grows Overnight Defense & National Security — Senate looks to break defense bill stalemate MORE (R-Mo.) on Sunday said the best thing former President TrumpDonald TrumpBaldwin calls Trump criticism following 'Rust' shooting 'surreal' Haley hits the stump in South Carolina Mary Trump files to dismiss Trump's lawsuit over NYT tax story MORE could do to help the Republican Party take back a majority in Congress in the 2022 midterms is to "talk about the future."
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