Sunday shows - Spotlight shifts to Senate for Biden spending plan

Multiple guests on the Sunday morning political talk shows discussed President BidenJoe BidenPfizer CEO says vaccine data for those under 5 could be available by end of year Omicron coronavirus variant found in at least 10 states Photos of the Week: Schumer, ASU protest and sea turtles MORE's social spending plan, which is now headed to the Senate after the House passed the Build Back Better Act.

Anthony FauciAnthony FauciThree omicron cases of COVID-19 identified in Maryland: Gov. Hogan FDA eyes rapid review for omicron vaccines, drugs: report Fauci calls out Fox News for letting host compare him to Nazi doctor: 'Astounded' MORE also discussed newly approved COVID-19 boosters for all adults, and gave his outlook for the holidays.

Read The Hill's complete coverage below.

 

Top Biden economic adviser optimistic as Build Back Better Act heads to Senate
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Brian DeeseBrian DeeseBiden says 'consumer spending has recovered' to pre-pandemic levels The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Arbery case, Biden spending bill each test views of justice Democrats optimistic as social spending bill heads to Senate MORE, director of the White House's National Economic Council, expressed optimism about the Build Back Better Act's prospects days after President Biden's social spending package passed in the House.
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Democratic senator: Others in party 'need to be open to compromise' on Biden agenda
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterDemocrats wrangle to keep climate priorities in spending bill  On The Money — Powell pivots as inflation rises Senators huddle on path forward for SALT deduction in spending bill MORE (D-Mont.) said on Sunday that his fellow Democratic lawmakers need to be open to compromise as the Build Back Better Act heads to the Senate following months of negotiations.
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Gillbrand: 'Manchin has come a long way on paid leave'
By CAROLINE VAKIL
 
Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandEx-officials voice deep concerns over new Pentagon UFO unit Paid leave advocates ramping up the pressure on Manchin and Schumer Gillibrand, bipartisan lawmakers push to keep military justice overhaul in NDAA MORE (D-N.Y.) said on Sunday that Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinOvernight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Dems press drillers over methane leaks Overnight Health Care — Presented by March of Dimes — Abortion access for 65M women at stake Joe Manchin should embrace paid leave — now MORE (D-W.Va.) “has come a long way on paid leave” as the Senate gets ready to take up the social spending bill after the Thanksgiving break.
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GOP senator: Democrats can only get funding for 'giveaway programs' from the middle class
By CAROLINE VAKIL
 
Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonWisconsin senators ask outsiders not to exploit parade attack 'for their own political purposes' It's time to bury ZombieCare once and for all Marjorie Taylor Greene introduces bill to award Congressional Gold Medal to Rittenhouse MORE (R-Wis.) said that Democrats can only get funding for “their giveaway programs,” apparently including provisions in their roughly $2 trillion social spending and climate bill, from the middle class.
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Sununu on Democrats saying spending package is paid for: 'Nobody buys that'
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
New Hampshire Gov. Chris SununuChris SununuChris Pappas launches reelection bid in New Hampshire Democrats optimistic as social spending bill heads to Senate Sunday shows - Spotlight shifts to Senate for Biden spending plan MORE (R) on Sunday dismissed Democrats’ claims that their massive social spending and climate package is fully paid for, arguing “nobody buys that.”
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Buttigieg dismisses reported rivalry with Harris
By JOSEPH CHOI 
 
Transportation Secretary Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Congress avoids shutdown Harris's office undergoes difficult reset The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden to announce increased measures for omicron MORE on Sunday shot down suggestions of a rivalry between him and Vice President Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisJoe Manchin should embrace paid leave — now The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden defends disappointing jobs report Harris's office undergoes difficult reset MORE, insisting that they are too busy focusing on the administration's goals to feud with each other.
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Fauci hopes COVID-19 boosters increase vaccines' durability
By CAROLINE VAKIL
 
President Biden’s chief medical adviser Anthony Fauci said on Sunday that he hopes COVID-19 boosters will increase vaccine durability so that “you will not necessarily need it” every six months or year.
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Fauci says fully vaccinated families can 'absolutely' enjoy holidays inside without masks
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
Anthony Fauci on Sunday said that fully vaccinated family members can “absolutely” enjoy holidays inside together without wearing masks.
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Republican Virginia lt. gov.-elect won't say if she is vaccinated against COVID-19
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
Republican Virginia Lt. Gov.-elect Winsome Sears on Sunday would not share her COVID-19 vaccination status following last month when she declined to say if she is vaccinated, contending that asking about such statuses becomes a “slippery slope” because it can lead to requests for other medical information.
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Economist advises Americans to 'wait it out' for non-urgent purchases amid supply chain crisis
By CAROLINE VAKIL 
 
“If you don't need to buy a car right now, wait it out. If you don't need to buy some of those other things that are goods that people have spent so much on. If you can wait it out a little bit, we're going to see some discounting on the other side of this, which makes it more of a boom-bust cycle. But it is you know, being able to pace yourself in terms of what you really need,” Diane Swonk said during “This Week” on ABC.
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Christie: Trump needs to stop talking about 'stolen' election and focus on future
By JOSEPH CHOI
 
Former New Jersey Republican Gov. Chris ChristieChris ChristieChristie: McCarthy, not Trump, will be the next Speaker The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Arbery case, Biden spending bill each test views of justice Sunday shows - Spotlight shifts to Senate for Biden spending plan MORE said on Sunday that former President TrumpDonald TrumpHillicon Valley — State Dept. employees targets of spyware Ohio Republican Party meeting ends abruptly over anti-DeWine protesters Jan. 6 panel faces new test as first witness pleads the Fifth MORE must stop talking about his belief that the 2020 presidential election was "stolen" and instead focus on the future if he wants to run again in 2024.
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Sununu sidesteps question on running for president in 2024
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu (R) on Sunday sidestepped a question on any presidential ambitions in 2024, saying he is focused on his work in the Granite State.
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O'Rourke says he stands by his 2019 'we're gonna take your AR-15, your AK-47' comment
By MYCHAEL SCHNELL
 
“Look, we are a state that has a long, proud tradition of responsible gun ownership. And most of us here in Texas do not want to see our friends, our family members, our neighbors shot up with these weapons of war. So yes, I still hold this view,” Democratic Texas gubernatorial candidate Beto O’Rourke said.
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