Sanders tells Latino group Trump 'will not be president'

Sanders tells Latino group Trump 'will not be president'
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Bernie SandersBernie SandersHickenlooper beats back progressive challenge in Colorado primary Progressive groups urge Biden to tap Warren as running mate Young Turks host says Elizabeth Warren should be Biden's VP pick MORE told a Latino leadership conference Thursday he "firmly" believes Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse panel approves 0.5B defense policy bill House panel votes against curtailing Insurrection Act powers after heated debate House panel votes to constrain Afghan drawdown, ask for assessment on 'incentives' to attack US troops MORE will not be president of the United States.

Addressing the National Association of Latino Elected Officials (NALEO), the Democratic presidential candidate said that Latino immigrant families live in "fear" and "sadness" and "what has exacerbated that fear is the presence of Donald Trump."

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While presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRepublican Nicole Malliotakis wins New York primary to challenge Max Rose Trump's evangelical approval dips, but remains high How Obama can win back millions of Trump voters for Biden MORE did not accept NALEO's invitation to speak at the event, Sanders made no mention of her in his speech, instead focusing on policy proposals and Trump's candidacy.

"I had hoped, and I think most Americans had hoped, that by the year 2016 maybe we would be beyond having candidates make bigotry the cornerstone of their campaigns," said Sanders.

Trump was also invited to speak but did not accept.

The Vermont senator was the lone major party to address NALEO's 2016 conference, but Libertarian nominee Gary JohnsonGary Earl JohnsonWhere Biden, Trump stand in key swing states Amash decides against Libertarian campaign for president The Hill's Campaign Report: Amash moves toward Libertarian presidential bid MORE is slated to speak at the event later Thursday. 

Republican presidential nominees John McCainJohn Sidney McCainJuan Williams: Time for boldness from Biden Democrats lead in three battleground Senate races: poll Republican Scott Taylor wins Virginia primary, to face Elaine Luria in rematch MORE in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012 addressed the group, as did President Obama in both years.

Sanders outlined four major issues confronting the Hispanic community: the need for comprehensive immigration reform, an inclusive economy, criminal justice system reform and the financial crisis in Puerto Rico.

The House passed bipartisan legislation meant to help Puerto Rico get out of debt on June 9, and it is now slated for review by the Senate. Sanders said in his speech that bill is "a very, very, very bad piece of legislation" and through it, "we are treating [Puerto Rico] as an absolute colony."

Sanders also slammed the Obama administration's deportation policies, saying immigration raids "must end" and advocating for temporary protected status for Central American families fleeing violence in their home countries. 

He argued in favor of the president's executive actions on immigration, saying that "if Congress does not do its job," the next president must also "use the executive powers of that office" to reform the immigration system.