Sanders tells Latino group Trump 'will not be president'

Sanders tells Latino group Trump 'will not be president'
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Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersHere's why Biden, Bernie and Beto are peaking Senate gears up for Green New Deal vote Overnight Energy: Green New Deal vote set to test Dem unity | Renewables on track to phase out coal, study finds | EPA chief reportedly recuses himself from mine review MORE told a Latino leadership conference Thursday he "firmly" believes Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpPapadopoulos claims he was pressured to sign plea deal Tlaib asking colleagues to support impeachment investigation resolution Trump rips 'Mainstream Media': 'They truly are the Enemy of the People' MORE will not be president of the United States.

Addressing the National Association of Latino Elected Officials (NALEO), the Democratic presidential candidate said that Latino immigrant families live in "fear" and "sadness" and "what has exacerbated that fear is the presence of Donald Trump."

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While presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonPapadopoulos claims he was pressured to sign plea deal Here's why Biden, Bernie and Beto are peaking The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Dems look for traction following Barr-Mueller findings MORE did not accept NALEO's invitation to speak at the event, Sanders made no mention of her in his speech, instead focusing on policy proposals and Trump's candidacy.

"I had hoped, and I think most Americans had hoped, that by the year 2016 maybe we would be beyond having candidates make bigotry the cornerstone of their campaigns," said Sanders.

Trump was also invited to speak but did not accept.

The Vermont senator was the lone major party to address NALEO's 2016 conference, but Libertarian nominee Gary JohnsonGary Earl JohnsonPotential GOP primary challenger: Trump's 'contempt for the American people' behind possible bid The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration Former Mass. governor takes step toward Trump primary challenge MORE is slated to speak at the event later Thursday. 

Republican presidential nominees John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSenate GOP eyes probes into 2016 issues 'swept under the rug' Gallego won't seek Ariz. Senate seat, clearing Dem path for Kelly Khizr Khan blasts Trump's McCain attacks: 'How dare this Russian-tainted president disrespects our hero' MORE in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012 addressed the group, as did President Obama in both years.

Sanders outlined four major issues confronting the Hispanic community: the need for comprehensive immigration reform, an inclusive economy, criminal justice system reform and the financial crisis in Puerto Rico.

The House passed bipartisan legislation meant to help Puerto Rico get out of debt on June 9, and it is now slated for review by the Senate. Sanders said in his speech that bill is "a very, very, very bad piece of legislation" and through it, "we are treating [Puerto Rico] as an absolute colony."

Sanders also slammed the Obama administration's deportation policies, saying immigration raids "must end" and advocating for temporary protected status for Central American families fleeing violence in their home countries. 

He argued in favor of the president's executive actions on immigration, saying that "if Congress does not do its job," the next president must also "use the executive powers of that office" to reform the immigration system.