'Kate's Law' battle shifts to the Senate, testing Dems

'Kate's Law' battle shifts to the Senate, testing Dems
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The fight over immigration enforcement is moving to the Senate, where Democratic opposition will be tested.

The House passed a pair of immigration bills late last week: “Kate’s Law” to increase maximum penalties for criminal aliens who attempt to re-enter the country, and a second bill cutting funding to cities that refuse to comply with federal immigration laws. 

Republicans got an unexpected boost when two-dozen House Democrats voted for “Kate’s Law,” viewed by GOP supporters as a first step toward implementing President Trump’s campaign promises on immigration.

The defections came after House Democratic leaders said they wouldn’t twist arms to get their members to oppose the legislation. But the outcome is raising questions about whether Democratic senators up for reelection in 2018 will similarly break rank as the fight shifts to the upper chamber.

Senate Democrats are expressing confidence that they’ll be able to block the bills if they are brought up for a vote. 

"I will do whatever I can in order to stop them. These are only punitive in nature, they don't deal with the totality of the reality of our immigration challenge, and as a continuing part of the Republican saga that only looks at one element, and looks at it in a way that is totally disproportionate," Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezWe can accelerate a cure for Alzheimer's The Hill's 12:30 Report: Manafort sentenced to total of 7.5 years in prison Acting Defense chief calls Graham an 'ally' after tense exchange MORE (D-N.J.) said. 

Democrats previously blocked similar proposals in 2015 and 2016. But a renewed push could force the 10 senators running for reelection in purple and red states won by Trump to take a tough, politically controversial vote.

A top House Democratic aide predicted that “Kate's Law” would be used in campaign ads against vulnerable Democrats. 

"The ad writes itself," said the aide. "They're gonna use Kate Steinle's picture in a Willie Horton-style ad," referring to a controversial 1988 TV ad used by President George H.W. Bush's campaign against Michael Dukakis. 

Red-state Democrats are remaining tightlipped about the two immigration bills amid the fight in the Senate over repealing ObamaCare.

But Democratic Sens. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellySome in GOP fear Buttigieg run for governor Paul Ryan joins University of Notre Dame faculty GOP senator issues stark warning to Republicans on health care MORE (Ind.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOn The Money: Cain 'very committed' to Fed bid despite opposition | Pelosi warns no US-UK trade deal if Brexit harms Irish peace | Ivanka Trump says she turned down World Bank job Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed Pro-life Christians are demanding pollution protections MORE (W.Va.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampPro-trade groups enlist another ex-Dem lawmaker to push for Trump's NAFTA replacement Pro-trade group targets 4 lawmakers in push for new NAFTA Biden office highlights support from women after second accuser comes forward MORE (N.D.) previously voted to take up a bill toughening penalties on some undocumented immigrants who illegally re-enter the country after being deported.

A senior Senate Democratic aide questioned if Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump, Dems prep for Mueller report's release McConnell touts Trump support, Supreme Court fights in reelection video Why Ken Cuccinelli should be Trump's choice for DHS MORE (R-Ky.) would bring up the House bills with Democrats still largely opposed to tougher immigration proposals.

“Nobody has changed their view on that to my knowledge. I'm not sure McConnell will even bring them up,” the aide said when asked if Democrats would be able to block the House bills similar to previous votes.

But Senate Republicans will likely face growing pressure to move a bill cracking down on illegal immigration after Trump praised the House-passed bill.

“Now that the House has acted, I urged the Senate to take up these bills, pass them, and send them to my desk. I am calling on all lawmakers to vote for these bills and to save American lives,” Trump said after the House’s vote. 

Trump repeatedly invoked the shooting of 32-year old Steinle on the campaign trail to promote his immigration agenda, including during his speech at the Republican National Convention last summer when he accepted the party’s nomination.

Steinle was fatally shot in 2015 in San Francisco by a man who had had seven previous felony convictions and was deported to Mexico on five previous occasions. 

The House bill could have competition for Senate floor time as lawmakers prepare to return for a jam packed three-week session where they have a slew of must-pass bills and a looming fight over Trump’s FBI nominee. 

But conservatives are already clamoring for the Senate to try to crack down on illegal immigration. Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzO'Rourke sweeps through Virginia looking to energize campaign Disney to donate million to rebuild Notre Dame Celebs start opening their wallets for 2020 Dems MORE (R-Texas) wants a vote this year and has introduced his own version of “Kate’s Law.”

“The House of Representatives took a tremendous step today to protect our national security and ensure the safety of our communities by passing Kate’s Law,” Cruz said after the House’s vote.  “I look forward to the Senate swiftly taking up this bill and hopefully, passing it.”

Unlike the House bill, Cruz’s version includes a five-year minimum sentence for any undocumented immigrant who re-enters the country illegally after previously being deported twice or convicted of an aggravated felony. 

A spokesman for McConnell said he didn’t “have any [scheduling] announcements yet this week.”

Sen. John CornynJohn Cornyn Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Trump struggles to reshape Fed Congress opens door to fraught immigration talks MORE (R-Texas), the No. 2 Senate Republican and a close ally of McConnell’s, is also working on a broader border security bill that is expected to touch on illegal immigration. 

The bill, which is still being crafted, includes mandatory minimum sentences for certain immigrants who try to re-enter the country after being deported, according to a draft copy of the legislation

A spokesperson for Cornyn confirmed on Monday that the bill would also target funding for cities that don’t comply with federal immigration policy but said “that provision is different than the bill passed by the House last week.”

Republicans will need to win over at least eight Democratic senators to pass any immigration or border security bill. Spokespeople for Manchin and Donnelly didn’t respond to a request for comment about their positions.

If the three Democratic senators did vote with Republicans on a proposal to impose tougher penalties on undocumented immigrants re-entering the country illegally, GOP leadership would still need to flip an additional five senators.

Their targets would likely include Democratic Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillBig Dem names show little interest in Senate Gillibrand, Grassley reintroduce campus sexual assault bill Endorsements? Biden can't count on a flood from the Senate MORE (Mo.), Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyLicense to discriminate: Religious exemption laws are trampling rights in rural America More than 30 Senate Dems ask Trump to reconsider Central American aid cuts Endorsements? Biden can't count on a flood from the Senate MORE (Pa.), Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownOnly four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates Budowsky: 2020 Dems should debate on Fox Overnight Health Care: How 2020 Dems want to overhaul health care | Brooklyn parents sue over measles vaccination mandate | Measles outbreak nears record MORE (Ohio), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonTrump administration renews interest in Florida offshore drilling: report Dem reps say they were denied access to immigrant detention center Ex-House Intel chair: Intel panel is wrong forum to investigate Trump's finances MORE (Fla.) and Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) Tester20 Dems demand no more money for ICE agents, Trump wall Overnight Energy: Bipartisan Senate group seeks more funding for carbon capture technology | Dems want documents on Interior pick's lobbying work | Officials push to produce more electric vehicle batteries in US Bipartisan senators want 'highest possible' funding for carbon capture technology MORE (Mont.) — each up for reelection next year in states won by Trump.

There are already early signs that a vote for or against the bill would be prime fodder for the 2018 election, where Democrats are defending 25 seats and Republicans are only protecting eight.

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds MORE (R-Nev.), up for reelection in a state won by Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMcAuliffe says he won't run for president in 2020 Chuck Todd slams reports that DOJ briefed Trump on Mueller findings: 'This is actual collusion' Crowdfund campaign to aid historically black churches hit by fires raises over M MORE, quickly hit two potential Democratic opponents for their votes against “Kate’s Law.” 

“Congresswomen Dina Titus and Jacky Rosen disqualified themselves from public office. Let’s be clear, Congresswomen Titus and Rosen sided with violent criminals, some of which have committed horrendous crimes against Nevadans, over law enforcement and keeping our communities safe,” said Tommy Ferraro, a spokesman for Heller’s re-election campaign. 

But Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOnly four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates Democratic proposals to overhaul health care: A 2020 primer Dems ask Justice Dept to release findings of Acosta-Epstein investigation MORE (D-Va.), who is also up for reelection, downplayed the chances that Democrats would help pass the bill as long as Republicans are unwilling to discuss broader immigration reforms.

“Democrats are not going to stand for harsh anti-immigration measures, we're not,” he said. “If they're not willing to meaningfully dialogue with us about immigration reform, you're not going to see us embracing their super-partisan anti-immigration bill.”