Trump administration sets quotas for immigration judges

Trump administration sets quotas for immigration judges
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The Department of Justice (DOJ) has reportedly set quotas for immigration judges for the first time, requiring them to close a certain number of cases per year.

The Wall Street Journal on Monday reported that the DOJ notified judges late last week that they will be evaluated based on how quickly they close immigration cases. The change is intended to speed up the process and clear the backlog of cases in the immigration courts.

Judges will be required to complete 700 cases per year, and to see fewer than 15 percent of their decision returned by a higher court, the Journal reported. Other requirements were issued pertaining to completing cases quickly after a hearing date.

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The new protocol will go into effect on Oct. 1, the Journal reported.

Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsBarr turned down defense attorney job with Trump: report Paul calls Trump's pick for attorney general's views on surveillance 'very troubling' John Kelly to leave White House at year's end MORE and other officials say delays in immigration courts have led to a backlog in processing individuals for deportation.

Immigration attorneys and the immigration judges’ union told the newspaper the new process could lead to expedited cases at the expense of waiting for all of the evidence to be presented in a defendant’s favor.

The changes to immigration courts are the latest in a series of efforts from the Trump administration to crack down on immigration.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement has ratcheted up its activity in arresting and deporting individuals in the country illegally since President TrumpDonald John TrumpCorsi sues Mueller for alleged leaks and illegal surveillance Comey: Trump 'certainly close' to being unindicted co-conspirator Trump pushes back on reports that Ayers was first pick for chief of staff MORE took office.

Trump on Sunday called on Republicans in the Senate to pass tougher immigration laws using the so-called nuclear option, which would allow the chamber to pass legislation with a simple majority.