Another Dem lawmaker calls to abolish ICE

Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D-N.Y.) on Friday joined the chorus of Democratic lawmakers calling for the abolishment of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

"ICE is being used to terrorize immigrant communities and carry out President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rallies in Nevada amid Supreme Court flurry: 'We're gonna get Brett' Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Trump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada MORE’s immoral ‘zero-tolerance’ policy," Velazquez said in a statement. "Moreover the agency’s almost myopic focus on harassing and targeting immigrants distracts from priorities most Americans actually share — like cracking down on transitional criminals and sex traffickers. At this point, modest reforms at the margins of the agency are insufficient. The time has come to abolish ICE." 

Her statement comes a day after Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandTeen girls pen open letter supporting Kavanaugh accuser: We imagine you at that party and 'see ourselves' Poll: Most Massachusetts voters don't think Warren should run for president in 2020 The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — GOP again has momentum on Kavanaugh rollercoaster MORE (D-N.Y.) became the first sitting senator to call for the agency's elimination.

Rep. Mark Pocan (D-Wis.) introduced legislation this week that would get rid of the federal agency. Democratic Reps. Earl Blumenauer (Ore.), Pramila Jayapal (Wash.), Jim McGovern (Mass.), Raúl Grijalva (Ariz.) and Michael Capuano (Mass.) have all indicated they would support measures to abolish the organization.

Their criticism of the agency is the latest scrutiny surrounding President Trump's immigration policies. Last week, the president signed an executive order to halt the administration's practice of separating families at the souther border, but it's still unclear how thousands of family members will be reunited.

On Friday, Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) criticized Congress for taking a weeklong recess without first addressing the border crisis.