Dem lawmakers join nationwide protests against Trump immigration policies

Various Democratic lawmakers joined tens of thousands of protesters at rallies across the country on Saturday to protest the Trump administration's separation of migrant children from their parents for detention.

Immigration and civil rights activists descended on downtown Washington, D.C., for a main rally on Saturday while more than 700 "sister" rallies occurred in cities and towns around the U.S. and in several cities around the world, according to organizers and social media posts.

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Maryland Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinThe Secure Act makes critical reforms to our retirement system — let's pass it this year Lawmakers honor JFK on 56th anniversary of his death Senate Democrats ask Pompeo to recuse himself from Ukraine matters MORE (D) attended a rally in Baltimore, tweeting photos from the march showing dozens of protesters holding signs aimed at the president and others assembled to hear featured speakers from the American Civil Liberties Union ACLU and other organizations.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenArtist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE (D) joined a rally in Boston where she ripped the administration's "ugly" immigration practices and called for Immigration and Customs Enforcement to be replaced.

Also spotted at the Boston rally were fellow Massachusetts lawmakers Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyThere's a lot to like about the Senate privacy bill, if it's not watered down Trump administration drops plan to face scan all travelers leaving or entering US Advocates hopeful dueling privacy bills can bridge partisan divide MORE (D) and Rep. Joe KennedyJoseph (Joe) Patrick KennedyTrump escalates fight over tax on tech giants Sanders's Massachusetts state director 'moves on' from campaign Senate Democrat's bill would allow sanctions for 'egregious' actions causing climate change MORE III (D), who also addressed the crowd.

In Atlanta, civil rights icon Rep. John LewisJohn LewisIsakson talks up bipartisanship in Senate farewell speech Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny Democrats ramp up oversight efforts over 'opportunity zone' incentive MORE (D-Ga.) called on a crowd to commit "good trouble, necessary trouble" to put an end to Trump's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, which led to the family separation crisis Trump sought to halt in an executive order last week.

"The world is crying with us," Lewis told the crowd. "We must show the world that we are better than what is going on in America today."

At the main protest in D.C., Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalOvernight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson – House progressives may try to block vote on Pelosi drug bill | McConnell, Grassley at odds over Trump-backed drug pricing bill | Lawmakers close to deal on surprise medical bills Hillicon Valley: FTC rules Cambridge Analytica engaged in 'deceptive practices' | NATO researchers warn social media failing to remove fake accounts | Sanders calls for breaking up Comcast, Verizon House Democrat presses Google executives for answers on handling of health data MORE (D-Wash.) addressed the crowd and spoke to The Hill about her arrest alongside immigration protesters earlier in the week.

"I was proud to be arrested with them," she said. "The Trump administration is doing this and I as a Congress member, a representative of the United States government, refused to allow my name to be used in that way."

A press release from organizers of the D.C. rally said that 30,000 protesters had gathered in the nation's capital as of 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, with thousands more attending rallies in cities across the U.S.

“When these groups came together for the first time a few weeks ago we set out to not just galvanize the usual suspects, but to recognize that everyone has a role in fighting for the country that we want," said Ai-Jen Poo, executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and one of the rally's organizers.

“Today’s event is not the culmination but the start of activating people from all walks of life, in every state to fight for the soul of American values.”