Foreign Affairs chairman: US military intervention in Venezuela 'not an option'

House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelOvernight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite Bipartisan House members call on Trump to rescind Erdoğan invitation House Democrats pull subpoena for ex-Trump national security official MORE (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday ruled out U.S. military intervention in Venezuela.

“I do worry about the president’s saber rattling, his hints that U.S. military intervention remains an option. I want to make clear to our witnesses and to anyone else watching: U.S. military intervention is not an option,” Engel said in his opening statement at a hearing on the political situation in Venezuela.

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Rep. Bill KeatingWilliam (Bill) Richard KeatingOvernight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite Bipartisan House members call on Trump to rescind Erdoğan invitation WHIP LIST: The 228 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry MORE (D-Mass.) asked Elliot Abrams, the United States' special representative for Venezuela, about whether other countries have discussed using military force in the country. Abrams said that he could not think of any.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpMost Americans break with Trump on Ukraine, but just 45 percent think he should be removed: poll Judge orders Democrats to give notice if they request Trump's NY tax returns Trump's doctor issues letter addressing 'speculation' about visit to Walter Reed MORE has repeatedly floated using U.S. forces to push out Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro. Earlier this month, he said U.S. military intervention in the country is an “option.”

Rep. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineHillicon Valley: Federal inquiry opened into Google health data deal | Facebook reports millions of post takedowns | Microsoft shakes up privacy debate | Disney plus tops 10M sign-ups in first day Top antitrust Dem presses DOJ, FTC on Google's Fitbit acquisition Hillicon Valley: California AG reveals Facebook investigation | McConnell criticizes Twitter's political ad ban | Lawmakers raise concerns over Google takeover of Fitbit | Dem pushes FCC to secure 5G networks MORE (D-R.I.) urged Abrams to tell the administration to make it clear that military intervention is off of the table.

The increase in pressure on Venezuela and threats of intervention come after National Assembly leader Juan Guaidó declared himself interim president last month. The U.S. immediately recognized him as the legitimate president of the country. Canada, the Organization of American States, Brazil, Argentina, Chile and Colombia all followed suit.

Guaidó gave an interview with AFP earlier this month in which he refused to rule out allowing U.S. forces to help push Maduro out of power.

Guaidó told AFP that he would do “everything that is necessary ... to save human lives” while acknowledging that U.S. intervention is “a very controversial subject," the outlet reported.

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeOvernight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families GOP senators balk at lengthy impeachment trial Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families MORE (R-Okla.), chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said Tuesday that the military may have to intervene in Venezuela if Russia places weapons there.

Engel made it clear, however, that the Democratic-controlled House would not support such a move.