Pelosi asks members to support resolution against emergency declaration

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Justice Department says Trump's tax returns should be released | Democrats fall short of votes for extending eviction ban House adjourns for recess without passing bill to extend federal eviction ban Photos of the Week: Olympic sabre semi-finals, COVID-19 vigil and a loris MORE (D-Calif.) circulated Wednesday a letter asking members of Congress to sign onto a resolution to terminate President TrumpDonald TrumpMeghan McCain: Democrats 'should give a little credit' to Trump for COVID-19 vaccine Trump testing czar warns lockdowns may be on table if people don't get vaccinated Overnight Health Care: CDC details Massachusetts outbreak that sparked mask update | White House says national vaccine mandate 'not under consideration at this time' MORE's border emergency declaration.

The resolution, presented by Rep. Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroLawmakers can't reconcile weakening the SALT cap with progressive goals House Democrats reintroduce bill addressing diversity at State Department Julian Castro joins NBC and MSNBC as political analyst MORE (D-Texas) who is the chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHS), will be introduced Friday.

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"The President’s decision to go outside the bounds of the law to try to get what he failed to achieve in the constitutional legislative process violates the Constitution and must be terminated," Pelosi wrote in her "Dear Colleague" letter. 

Pelosi took the unusual step of sending the letter to both Democrats and Republicans in the House.

Pelosi added that Castro's privileged resolution will move quickly -- it will be reported within 15 calendar days and moved to the House floor for consideration within three days after that. Pelosi noted she hopes the upper chamber will move on the resolution after it's passed in the House.

Trump last month signed a spending bill to keep government open, but added an emergency declaration to procure funds for a border wall that was not funded by Congress. The move was met with strong pushback from Democrats and a handful of Republicans who felt it was an overreach of power. 

Pelosi argued in the letter that members have an obligation to uphold the power of the legislative branch. 

Castro's bill already has more than 90 supporters, according to a report on Reuters, and is likely to receive ample support in the Democratic majority.

-Juliegrace Brufke contributed to this report which was updated at 8:54 p.m.