Border activists set up #NoKidsInCages art installations around NYC

Border activists set up #NoKidsInCages art installations around NYC
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New York City police have removed several art installations in the city that play audio of crying migrant children, according to The Washington Post.

The 24 installations, which appear to be constructed of paper, replicate sleeping children in cages and are accompanied by speakers playing the audio. Some of the audio comes from clips recorded inside a migrant holding facility and published by ProPublica last year.

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The displays, titled "No Kids in Cages," were left outside of Google’s New York headquarters, highly trafficked parts of the city and several news organizations, including CNN, Fox News and Newsweek, as well as one outside the Barclays Center that police have removed, according to the newspaper.

They first began appearing around the city in the early hours of Wednesday morning, according to PIX11.

Organizers called the installations “an emotional, provocative, multi-sensory experience that represents the conditions that children are being subjected to at the border due to the Department of Justice's Zero Tolerance Immigration Enforcement Policy,” according to the station.

The idea was the brainchild of ad agency Badger & Winters in support of RAICES, a Texas-based nonprofit that provides legal aid to immigrants and refugees, according to The Washington Post.

“The litmus test of any society is how it treats children. By normalizing the detention of children in cages, we’re only going further down the path of forsaking the rights of all children,” RAICES Executive Director Jonathan Ryan said in a news release, according to the Post.

The installations appeared a week after federal officials announced they would open three emergency shelters for thousands of unaccompanied minors amid overcrowding at facilities.

The number of unaccompanied children apprehended this fiscal year has increased 74 percent to more than 56,000, according to the Post.