Puerto Ricans joke online about what it would be like to be part of Denmark

Puerto Ricans are taking to Twitter to muse about what the U.S. territory would be like under Danish control.

The tweets come after Trump reportedly joked about trading Puerto Rico for Greenland, which is a part of Denmark.

Former Gov. Aníbal Acevedo Vilá took the opportunity to lash out at two political rivals, Republican Resident Commissioner Jenniffer González-Colón and Gov. Wanda Vázquez Garced, who earlier this week said she is "inclined toward Republican philosophies."

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"According to the New York Times, Trump proposed to exchange us for Greenland. What does Jenniffer González have to say about this? Will she remain quiet again? And the Governor, will she keep considering to declare herself a Republican? The dignity of Puerto Rico is not negotiable," wrote Acevedo.

Trump's alleged joke came as the territory faces what has stretched to a two-year recovery process from 2017's Hurricane Maria amid internal political strife.

Some Puerto Ricans are taking a lighthearted approach to the long-shot scenario, wondering what it would be like to join one of the countries with the highest human development standards on Earth.

"Well, if [Trump] leaves us with Denmark I think we would be much better off. It's a true first world country and not a shoddy one," wrote user AutoraVincent.

Puerto Rico's status has always been a factor in the island's politics, but it took on a new life in 2016, when González-Colón and former Gov. Ricardo Rosselló won the two territory-wide elections on a statehood ticket.

Their victory followed a Supreme Court decision that forced many to rethink the territory's status as a "free associated state," as Justice Elena KaganElena KaganOvernight Energy: EPA watchdog slams agency chief after deputy fails to cooperate in probe | Justices wrestle with reach of Clean Water Act | Bipartisan Senate climate caucus grows Justices wrestle with reach of Clean Water Act Justices appear divided over expanding police officers' traffic stop power MORE penned a decision essentially putting Puerto Rico under the full sovereignty of the United States.

And stateside reluctance to seriously consider statehood, plus the Trump administration's response to Hurricane Maria, has left many on the island with a bitter taste of the country the territory twice voted to join.

Some Puerto Ricans were quick to pledge loyalty to Denmark.

"OUR queen: Margarita II of Denmark," wrote one user, using the Spanish Margarita, rather than the Danish Margrethe.

But Heriberto Martínez Otero, an economist who's written about financial austerity and its effects on human development in Puerto Rico, commented on how Puerto Rico could change Denmark, a constitutional monarchy.

"If Puerto Rico becomes a Danish overseas territory, our fundamental mission will be to abolish the monarchy, and convert Denmark into a Republic," wrote Martínez.