Koch groups take immigration art exhibit to DC ahead of DACA hearing at Supreme Court

Koch groups take immigration art exhibit to DC ahead of DACA hearing at Supreme Court
© Greg Nash

The top nonprofit groups affiliated with conservative mega-donor Charles Koch are unveiling a pop-up art exhibit in Washington, D.C., meant to extol the benefits of immigration. 

The "Common Ground" exhibit comes ahead of a Nov. 12 Supreme Court hearing on the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

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It features nine doors with life-size video screens that show different aspects of immigrant life in the United States.

The exhibit is being brought to Washington by Stand Together, the main nonprofit arm of the Koch network, in conjunction with Americans for Prosperity and the Libre Institute, also nonprofit groups within the Koch orbit.

The exhibit will open Tuesday in Washington's renovated Wharf area, after showings at Nashville's Politicon and Miami's Wynwood Art District.

It shows nine aspects of immigrant life, starting with a door titled "Meet Dreamers," in allusion to DACA recipients, commonly known as "Dreamers."

Dreamers are on the forefront of the immigration debate as the Supreme Court gears up for the Nov. 12 hearing, where it will decide on the legality of President TrumpDonald John TrumpWatergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump In private moment with Trump, Justice Kennedy pushed for Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination: book Obama: 'Everybody needs to chill out' about differences between 2020 candidates MORE's 2017 order to revoke the Obama-era program.

Under DACA, undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as minors, registered, paid a fee and passed a background check were given a reprieve from deportation and permission to work in the country. Those permits are renewable every two years.

The program was meant as a bridge while Congress legislated a permanent solution for Dreamers.

Trump in September 2017 canceled the program, arguing President Obama had overreached and single-handedly legislated on immigration by granting work permits in addition to deferred action on deportation.

Lower courts in California, New York and the District of Columbia have so far blocked Trump's order, which means DACA recipients can keep their benefits and apply for renewals.

But the Supreme Court in June agreed to hear the case to decide whether it agrees with the lower courts' rulings, including the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals' findings that Trump's order was unlawful because it was "arbitrary and capricious."