Survey finds Hispanic community worries more than other groups mass shootings, healthcare: report

Survey finds Hispanic community worries more than other groups mass shootings, healthcare: report
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Hispanic adults worry more than adults of other ethnic groups about both the threat of mass shootings and paying for health care, according to a new report. 

The American Psychological Association's "Stress in America" report, released this week, found that mass shootings were a source of stress for 71 percent of Americans and that health care was a source of stress for 69 percent. 

The survey found that mass shootings were a source of stress for 84 percent of Hispanic respondents, 79 percent of black respondents, 77 percent of Asian respondents, 71 percent of Native American respondents and 66 percent of white respondents. The survey was conducted around the time that 22 people were killed in a mass shooting that was allegedly motivated by anti-Hispanic sentiments. 

The survey also found that more than 55 percent of adults worry that they may not be able to afford health care services. This was true of 65 percent of Hispanic respondents, 53 percent of white respondents, 53 percent of Black respondents and 49 percent of Native American respondents. 

Researchers surveyed 3,617 adults living in the U.S. between Aug. 1 and Sept. 3. There were several high-profile mass shootings during that time period.