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Democrats launch bilingual ad campaign off drug pricing bill

Democrats launch bilingual ad campaign off drug pricing bill
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The House Democrats' campaign arm on Friday launched a bilingual campaign to shore up support among voters in swing districts, touting a drug pricing bill that passed the House the day before. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) digital ad campaign will feature ads in Spanish and a mix of both Spanish and English — "Spanglish" — targeting Hispanics, who are disproportionately affected by high prescription drug costs.

It will be shown in 11 Democratic-held districts, seven in Spanish and the rest in Spanglish, and in eight GOP-held districts, four in each format.

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There will also be an English-language version of the ad in key battleground districts.

The ad will tout H.R. 3, the Elijah E. Cummings Lower Drug Costs Now Act, a legislative priority of Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats make full-court press on expanded child tax credit Maria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' Democratic clamor grows for select committee on Jan. 6 attack MORE (D-Calif.) that passed the House on a largely party-line 230-192 vote Thursday.

All Democrats present voted for the bill; two Republicans, Reps. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 COVID-19 long-haulers press Congress for paid family leave MORE (Pa.) and Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerBiden needles GOP touting rescue plan they opposed: 'Some people have no shame' GOP leader's Jan. 6 call to Trump draws scrutiny in commission fight Progressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill MORE (Wash.), voted with Democrats.

The DCCC attack ad will air in the districts held by Republican Reps. Dave Schweikert (Ariz.), Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesTech privacy practices under scrutiny after DOJ subpoenas GOP's Stefanik defends Trump DOJ secret subpoenas CNN reporter's phone and email records secretly obtained by Trump administration: report MORE (Calif.), Scott TiptonScott R. TiptonGosar's office denies he will appear on popular QAnon talk show Democrats press to bar lawmakers from carrying guns in the Capitol House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit MORE (Colo.), Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (Fla.), Brian MastBrian Jeffrey MastHouse GOP fights back against mask, metal detector fines Massie, Greene trash mask violation warnings from House sergeant at arms House rejects GOP effort to roll back chamber's mask mandate MORE (Fla.), Mike McCaul (Texas), Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene Roy14 Republicans vote against making Juneteenth a federal holiday 21 Republicans vote against awarding medals to police who defended Capitol The Hill's Morning Report - Biden-Putin meeting to dominate the week MORE (Texas) and John CarterJohn Rice CarterBottom line READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit MORE (Texas).

In a short eight-second animation, the Spanglish version of the ad reads, "Los republicanos just voted against lowering the cost of prescription drugs!"

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A similar version will run in Democratic-held districts that reads, "Los demócratas just voted to lower the cost of prescription drugs!"

The pro-Democrat ads will run in the districts held by Democratic Reps. Tom O’Halleran (Ariz.), Josh Harder (Calif.), TJ Cox (Calif.), Gil CisnerosGilbert (Gil) Ray CisnerosMORE (Calif.), Jason CrowJason CrowOvernight Defense: Biden, Putin agree to launch arms control talks at summit | 2002 war authorization repeal will get Senate vote | GOP rep warns Biden 'blood with be on his hands' without Afghan interpreter evacuation GOP rep: If Biden doesn't evacuate Afghan interpreters, 'blood will be on his hands' Pelosi floats Democrat-led investigation of Jan. 6 as commission alternative MORE (Colo.), Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellStephanie Murphy won't run for Senate seat in Florida next year Hispanic Democrats slam four Republicans over Jan. 6 vote in new ads Colombia's protests are threat, test for US MORE (Fla.), Xochitl Torres Small (N.M.), Susie LeeSuzanne (Susie) Kelley LeeMORE (Nev.), Steven HorsfordSteven Alexander HorsfordWorkers and seniors deserve investments in home care infrastructure Biden unveils plan for racial equity at Tulsa Race Massacre centennial Tulsa marks race massacre centennial as US grapples with racial injustice MORE (Nev.), Lizzie Fletcher (Texas), and Colin Allred (Texas).

The ads run in Texas and California will not feature the members' names to comply with state campaign blackouts; in other states the names will be featured in the ads.

H.R. 3 would allow the federal government to negotiate prescription drug prices, a top Democratic campaign promise.

Mucarsel-Powell told The Hill on Thursday the bill is "monumental."

"[The bill] provided $50 billion in savings, and what's important for a lot of people in my community is that you can use a lot of those savings to reinvest in community health clinics to provide primary care," she said.

The bill is unlikely to be taken up by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats go down to the wire with Manchin Schumer unloads on GOP over elections bill: 'How despicable of a man is Donald Trump?' This week: Senate set for voting rights fight MORE (R-Ky.), but the DCCC campaign is a first taste of how Democrats hope to reach Hispanic voters on an issue that regularly ranks among the top concerns for the demographic group.

"I don't expect for Mitch McConnell in the Senate to agree with every word of every bill that we send them, but I do expect them to actually hold hearings, offer amendments and do their job," said Rep. Mike Levin (D-Calif.), a Congressional Hispanic Caucus member who flipped a Republican seat in 2018.

Still, some Republicans in Latino-heavy districts say they can reach their electorate on the merits of voting against the proposal.

"If you look at the overall impact of H.R. 3 versus what we're trying to propose, we've got a better pathway to take for the long term," said Rep. Dan NewhouseDaniel (Dan) Milton NewhouseProgressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel House lawmakers unveil bill to end ban on Postal Service shipments of alcohol MORE (R-Wash.), who won his agricultural, 40 percent Hispanic district in 2014.

Newhouse added that the Republican proposal balances support for expensive medical research with lowering prescription drug prices, a message that "may be more difficult to get across, but I think we can do that."