Democrats launch bilingual ad campaign off drug pricing bill

Democrats launch bilingual ad campaign off drug pricing bill
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The House Democrats' campaign arm on Friday launched a bilingual campaign to shore up support among voters in swing districts, touting a drug pricing bill that passed the House the day before. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) digital ad campaign will feature ads in Spanish and a mix of both Spanish and English — "Spanglish" — targeting Hispanics, who are disproportionately affected by high prescription drug costs.

It will be shown in 11 Democratic-held districts, seven in Spanish and the rest in Spanglish, and in eight GOP-held districts, four in each format.

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There will also be an English-language version of the ad in key battleground districts.

The ad will tout H.R. 3, the Elijah E. Cummings Lower Drug Costs Now Act, a legislative priority of Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSupreme Court rulings reignite Trump oversight wars in Congress Pelosi on Baltimore's Columbus statue: 'If the community doesn't want the statue, the statue shouldn't be there' Pelosi says House won't cave to Senate on worker COVID-19 protections MORE (D-Calif.) that passed the House on a largely party-line 230-192 vote Thursday.

All Democrats present voted for the bill; two Republicans, Reps. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickKaren Bass's star rises after leading police reform push The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - States are pausing reopening Democrats release bilingual ads on police reform bill MORE (Pa.) and Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerHispanic Caucus endorses Washington Latina House candidate Cornell to launch new bipartisan publication led by former Rep. Steve Israel Campaigns face attack ad dilemma amid coronavirus crisis MORE (Wash.), voted with Democrats.

The DCCC attack ad will air in the districts held by Republican Reps. Dave Schweikert (Ariz.), Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesHow conservative conspiracy theories are deepening America's political divide Lawmaker-linked businesses received PPP loans Voters must strongly reject the president's abuses by voting him out this November MORE (Calif.), Scott TiptonScott R. TiptonHillicon Valley: QAnon scores wins, creating GOP problem | Supreme Court upholds regulation banning robocalls to cellphones | Foreign hackers take aim at homebound Americans | Uber acquires Postmates On The Trail: Trump, coronavirus fuel unprecedented voter enthusiasm QAnon scores wins, creating GOP problem MORE (Colo.), Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (Fla.), Brian MastBrian Jeffrey MastDemocrats start cracking down on masks for lawmakers House Republicans push back against proxy voting GOP lawmakers consider returning to DC despite coronavirus shutdown MORE (Fla.), Mike McCaul (Texas), Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyLawmaker-linked businesses received PPP loans House Republicans urge White House to support TSA giving travelers temperature checks GOP lawmakers raise concerns over veterans' access to health care amid pandemic MORE (Texas) and John CarterJohn Rice CarterDemocrats see victory in Trump culture war George Floyd and the upcoming Texas Democratic Senate runoff Texas Senate candidate swipes at Cruz feud with Ron Perlman: 'I handle my own fights' MORE (Texas).

In a short eight-second animation, the Spanglish version of the ad reads, "Los republicanos just voted against lowering the cost of prescription drugs!"

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A similar version will run in Democratic-held districts that reads, "Los demócratas just voted to lower the cost of prescription drugs!"

The pro-Democrat ads will run in the districts held by Democratic Reps. Tom O’Halleran (Ariz.), Josh Harder (Calif.), TJ Cox (Calif.), Gil CisnerosGilbert (Gil) Ray CisnerosMORE (Calif.), Jason CrowJason CrowCelebrating our freedoms and counting all military votes this November House panel votes to constrain Afghan drawdown, ask for assessment on 'incentives' to attack US troops Overnight Defense: House panel votes to ban Confederate flag on all Pentagon property | DOD report says Russia working to speed US withdrawal from Afghanistan | 'Gang of Eight' to get briefing on bounties Thursday MORE (Colo.), Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellLawmaker-linked businesses received PPP loans Democrats start cracking down on masks for lawmakers The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Former Rep. Delaney says Trump is spewing venom when he should be leading; Protests roil the nation as fears of new virus outbreaks grow MORE (Fla.), Xochitl Torres Small (N.M.), Susie LeeSuzanne (Susie) Kelley LeeMORE (Nev.), Steven HorsfordSteven Alexander HorsfordRep. Steven Horsford wins Democratic House primary in Nevada Overnight Defense: Army now willing to rename bases named after Confederates | Dems demand answers on 'unfathomable' nuke testing discussions | Pentagon confirms death of north African al Qaeda leader Top Democrats demand answers on Trump administration's 'unfathomable' consideration of nuclear testing MORE (Nev.), Lizzie Fletcher (Texas), and Colin Allred (Texas).

The ads run in Texas and California will not feature the members' names to comply with state campaign blackouts; in other states the names will be featured in the ads.

H.R. 3 would allow the federal government to negotiate prescription drug prices, a top Democratic campaign promise.

Mucarsel-Powell told The Hill on Thursday the bill is "monumental."

"[The bill] provided $50 billion in savings, and what's important for a lot of people in my community is that you can use a lot of those savings to reinvest in community health clinics to provide primary care," she said.

The bill is unlikely to be taken up by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHouse chairman asks CDC director to testify on reopening schools during pandemic Senate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick Pelosi says House won't cave to Senate on worker COVID-19 protections MORE (R-Ky.), but the DCCC campaign is a first taste of how Democrats hope to reach Hispanic voters on an issue that regularly ranks among the top concerns for the demographic group.

"I don't expect for Mitch McConnell in the Senate to agree with every word of every bill that we send them, but I do expect them to actually hold hearings, offer amendments and do their job," said Rep. Mike Levin (D-Calif.), a Congressional Hispanic Caucus member who flipped a Republican seat in 2018.

Still, some Republicans in Latino-heavy districts say they can reach their electorate on the merits of voting against the proposal.

"If you look at the overall impact of H.R. 3 versus what we're trying to propose, we've got a better pathway to take for the long term," said Rep. Dan NewhouseDaniel (Dan) Milton NewhouseThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Khanna says President Trump threatening violence against US citizens; Trump terminating relationship with WHO GOP lawmaker introduces bipartisan guest worker bill Overnight Energy: Murkowski, Manchin unveil major energy bill | Lawmakers grill EPA chief over push to slash agency's budget | GOP lawmaker accuses Trump officials of 'playing politics' over Yucca Mountain MORE (R-Wash.), who won his agricultural, 40 percent Hispanic district in 2014.

Newhouse added that the Republican proposal balances support for expensive medical research with lowering prescription drug prices, a message that "may be more difficult to get across, but I think we can do that."