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Democrats launch bilingual ad campaign off drug pricing bill

Democrats launch bilingual ad campaign off drug pricing bill
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The House Democrats' campaign arm on Friday launched a bilingual campaign to shore up support among voters in swing districts, touting a drug pricing bill that passed the House the day before. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) digital ad campaign will feature ads in Spanish and a mix of both Spanish and English — "Spanglish" — targeting Hispanics, who are disproportionately affected by high prescription drug costs.

It will be shown in 11 Democratic-held districts, seven in Spanish and the rest in Spanglish, and in eight GOP-held districts, four in each format.

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There will also be an English-language version of the ad in key battleground districts.

The ad will tout H.R. 3, the Elijah E. Cummings Lower Drug Costs Now Act, a legislative priority of Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCowboys for Trump founder arrested following Capitol riot Retired Army general: 'We can't have demonstrators showing up at a state Capitol with damn long guns' Graham calls on Schumer to hold vote to dismiss article of impeachment against Trump MORE (D-Calif.) that passed the House on a largely party-line 230-192 vote Thursday.

All Democrats present voted for the bill; two Republicans, Reps. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickGrowing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment GOP lawmakers introduce resolution to censure Trump over Capitol riot Kinzinger says he'll vote to impeach Trump MORE (Pa.) and Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents The Hill's Morning Report - Trump impeached again; now what? Kinzinger says he is 'in total peace' after impeachment vote MORE (Wash.), voted with Democrats.

The DCCC attack ad will air in the districts held by Republican Reps. Dave Schweikert (Ariz.), Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesNSA places former GOP political operative in top lawyer position after Pentagon chief's reported order CIA chief threatened to resign over push to install Trump loyalist as deputy: report Bill Belichick turns down Medal of Freedom from Trump MORE (Calif.), Scott TiptonScott R. TiptonDemocrats press to bar lawmakers from carrying guns in the Capitol House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit Newly elected Colorado Republican wants to carry her gun in the Capitol: report MORE (Colo.), Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (Fla.), Brian MastBrian Jeffrey MastTapper battles GOP lawmakers over criticism of Afghan vet's Electoral College vote Republican war veteran gives Guard troops a tour of the Capitol LIVE COVERAGE: House votes to impeach Trump after Capitol insurrection MORE (Fla.), Mike McCaul (Texas), Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyGOP divided over Liz Cheney's future Trust between lawmakers reaches all-time low after Capitol riots GOP senators blame Trump after mob overruns Capitol MORE (Texas) and John CarterJohn Rice CarterREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit GOP's Carter fends off challenge in Texas MORE (Texas).

In a short eight-second animation, the Spanglish version of the ad reads, "Los republicanos just voted against lowering the cost of prescription drugs!"

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A similar version will run in Democratic-held districts that reads, "Los demócratas just voted to lower the cost of prescription drugs!"

The pro-Democrat ads will run in the districts held by Democratic Reps. Tom O’Halleran (Ariz.), Josh Harder (Calif.), TJ Cox (Calif.), Gil CisnerosGilbert (Gil) Ray CisnerosMORE (Calif.), Jason CrowJason CrowThousands of troops dig in for inauguration Sixth House Republican backs Trump impeachment Democrat: GOP colleagues say they're 'afraid for their lives' if they vote to impeach Trump MORE (Colo.), Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellTrump, Florida complicate Biden approach to Cuba The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Coast-to-coast fears about post-holiday COVID-19 spread The Memo: Democrats see warning signs beyond 2020 MORE (Fla.), Xochitl Torres Small (N.M.), Susie LeeSuzanne (Susie) Kelley LeeMORE (Nev.), Steven HorsfordSteven Alexander HorsfordNevada Democrat Steven Horsford wins reelection The robbing of a wildlife refuge in Nevada Rep. Steven Horsford wins Democratic House primary in Nevada MORE (Nev.), Lizzie Fletcher (Texas), and Colin Allred (Texas).

The ads run in Texas and California will not feature the members' names to comply with state campaign blackouts; in other states the names will be featured in the ads.

H.R. 3 would allow the federal government to negotiate prescription drug prices, a top Democratic campaign promise.

Mucarsel-Powell told The Hill on Thursday the bill is "monumental."

"[The bill] provided $50 billion in savings, and what's important for a lot of people in my community is that you can use a lot of those savings to reinvest in community health clinics to provide primary care," she said.

The bill is unlikely to be taken up by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGraham calls on Schumer to hold vote to dismiss article of impeachment against Trump Rove: Chances of conviction rise if Giuliani represents Trump in Senate impeachment trial Boebert communications director resigns amid Capitol riot: report MORE (R-Ky.), but the DCCC campaign is a first taste of how Democrats hope to reach Hispanic voters on an issue that regularly ranks among the top concerns for the demographic group.

"I don't expect for Mitch McConnell in the Senate to agree with every word of every bill that we send them, but I do expect them to actually hold hearings, offer amendments and do their job," said Rep. Mike Levin (D-Calif.), a Congressional Hispanic Caucus member who flipped a Republican seat in 2018.

Still, some Republicans in Latino-heavy districts say they can reach their electorate on the merits of voting against the proposal.

"If you look at the overall impact of H.R. 3 versus what we're trying to propose, we've got a better pathway to take for the long term," said Rep. Dan NewhouseDaniel (Dan) Milton NewhouseUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents The Hill's Morning Report - Trump impeached again; now what? Kinzinger says he is 'in total peace' after impeachment vote MORE (R-Wash.), who won his agricultural, 40 percent Hispanic district in 2014.

Newhouse added that the Republican proposal balances support for expensive medical research with lowering prescription drug prices, a message that "may be more difficult to get across, but I think we can do that."