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Hopes for DC, Puerto Rico statehood rise

Hopes for DC, Puerto Rico statehood rise
© Greg Nash

The prospects of statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., have never been greater, but many significant obstacles loom.

The Democratic-led House has already passed a statehood bill for the District, the first time such a bill has ever been approved by a chamber of Congress.

And support for statehood has been growing in Puerto Rico.

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“We see both Puerto Rico and D.C. statehood surging into the mainstream debate over the past couple of weeks in particular with the upcoming plebiscite in November, statements by Vice President Biden ... and it’s come into greater focus with the death of Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Mitt Romney did not vote for Trump in 2020 election The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett MORE,” said Rep. Darren SotoDarren Michael SotoRadiation elevated at fracking sites, researchers find Hopes for DC, Puerto Rico statehood rise Florida Democrat introduces bill to recognize Puerto Rico statehood referendum MORE (D-Fla.), referring to Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida Supreme Court reinstates ban on curbside voting in Alabama MORE.

To be sure, statehood for either Puerto Rico or the District is no sure thing. Democrats will need to win the race for the White House and take a majority in the Senate. Democrats would then have to do away with the legislative filibuster, a potential move that divides the party.

The bill that was passed by the House in June — H.R. 51 — doesn’t eliminate the District of Columbia, but rather shrinks it to a much smaller area that includes many of the buildings where the federal government conducts official business. The remainder of what is currently D.C. would become the 51st state.

Even if Democrats win back the Senate and the White House and H.R. 51 were to be enacted, the 23rd Amendment to the Constitution would need to be repealed, a change that would require ratification by at least 38 states, which would be a daunting challenge.

In the Senate, three Democrats — Doug Jones (Ala.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSusan Collins and the American legacy Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein Push to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw MORE (W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.) — as well as Sen. Angus KingAngus KingSusan Collins and the American legacy Coordinated federal leadership is needed for recovery of US travel and tourism Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats MORE (I-Maine), who caucuses with Democrats, have not sponsored the legislation.

But in a sign of how things have changed, there is a lot of talk about the issue in 2020. In 2009, after Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaObama to campaign for Biden in Florida Jaime Harrison on Lindsey Graham postponing debate: 'He's on the verge of getting that one-way ticket back home' Quinnipiac poll reports Biden leading Trump by 8 points in Pennsylvania MORE became the first Black president and Democrats had a commanding majority in the Senate, statehood was not a priority for the party.

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Paul Strauss, one of D.C.’s shadow senators, attributed the difference to “the tremendous momentum that we have in the country in support of this equality. D.C. statehood used to be considered kind of a local, fringe issue and now it is a mainstream, national issue.”

While D.C. statehood has broad political support within the District, statehood for Puerto Rico is more complicated and divisive on the island. The Puerto Rico statehood process would be simpler than in Washington, requiring only a majority in both chambers and the president’s signature, following the processes that made Alaska and Hawaii states in the late 1950s.

But unlike D.C., statehood is not overwhelmingly supported in Puerto Rico. Opponents say statehood would be the culmination of a colonial process that would rob Puerto Rico of its national identity, and they prefer to explore other options, including independence.

“You cannot compare statehood for D.C. and statehood for Puerto Rico. D.C. is not a colony, Puerto Rico is a colony,” said Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D-N.Y.), who last month introduced a bill for Puerto Rico to hold a convention to decide its best status option.

Republican lawmakers have increasingly used opposition to D.C. and Puerto Rican statehood as they seek to keep their narrow majority in the Senate.

Democrats want to make “the swamp itself, Washington, D.C., America’s 51st state,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits Trump casts doubt on hopes for quick stimulus deal after aides expressed optimism Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid MORE (R-Ky.) said during an appearance at the Republican National Convention. “With two more liberal senators, we cannot undo the damage they’ve done.”

The GOP’s staunch opposition to D.C. statehood has often been called by critics an attempt to suppress and disenfranchise minority voters. When the push for D.C. statehood began in the 1980s, the District’s population was majority Black. D.C. is now about 47 percent Black, but still a majority-minority city.

D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes NortonEleanor Holmes NortonOcasio-Cortez, progressives call on Senate not to confirm lobbyists or executives to future administration posts Hopes for DC, Puerto Rico statehood rise Shakespeare Theatre Company goes virtual for 'Will on the Hill...or Won't They?' MORE (D) told The Hill, “[Republicans] are very afraid because more than 90 percent of the Democrats in the Senate support D.C. statehood [and] they are in strong danger of losing the Senate.”

“[Statehood] has come into greater focus with the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, as we look at what kind of democracy we’ll have within a couple of years,” said Soto, the first Floridian representative of Puerto Rican origin.

While a state in D.C. would almost certainly add two Democrats to the Senate, it’s less clear if that would be the case in Puerto Rico.

Resident Commissioner Jenniffer González-Colón (R-Puerto Rico) said Republicans who think Puerto Rico would consistently yield two Democratic senators simply don’t understand the island’s residents.

“They don’t know how conservative Hispanics and Puerto Ricans are, and they don’t know the number of Puerto Ricans who have fought in the armed forces, and they don’t know the platform of the Republican Party, which for the last 45 years has supported statehood,” said González.

“I am convinced Puerto Rico will be a competitive state,” she added.

Some Republicans support Puerto Rican statehood, including Florida’s two senators, as well as Reps. Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungDemocrats, GOP fighting over largest House battlefield in a decade Coordinated federal leadership is needed for recovery of US travel and tourism Alaska may select our next president MORE (Alaska) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickLawmakers urge IRS to get stimulus payments to domestic violence survivors Hopes for DC, Puerto Rico statehood rise Florida Democrat introduces bill to recognize Puerto Rico statehood referendum MORE (Pa.), who co-sponsored a resolution introduced by Soto to recognize Puerto Rico’s upcoming statehood referendum.

Florida Republican Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioIntel officials say Iran, Russia seeking to influence election Senate Intel leaders warn of election systems threats Trump remarks put pressure on Barr MORE and Rick Scott have come out in favor of allowing Puerto Ricans to choose statehood, partly out of deference to the solidly pro-statehood Puerto Rican diaspora in central Florida.

Most Democrats support changing Puerto Rico’s status, but there is opposition on the left wing of the party, including Norton.

“Puerto Rico has two problems. One, it is bankrupt, so the United States has had to pump money in it just to keep it going. In order to become a state, you [have] to … show that you’re fully able to support yourself,” she said. “The second is, Puerto Ricans haven’t yet taken a vote on statehood.”

Puerto Rico is having a referendum in November on the issue, but opponents of statehood call the entire exercise “a sham,” accusing the territory’s ruling pro-statehood party — a coalition of centrist Democrats and the island’s Republicans — of holding the vote to boost its turnout in November’s general election.

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“The yes or no vote on statehood is a sham,” said former Rep. Luis Gutiérrez (D-Ill.), who now lives in Puerto Rico and favors independence.

“The autonomist view in Puerto Rico and the independentist tradition were never allowed the opportunity to fully participate. It’s packed, it’s stacked. It’s based on lies,” he said.

Biden treaded carefully during a speech last week in Kissimmee, Fla., saying he believes statehood is “the most effective means of ensuring residents of Puerto Rico are treated equally,” but left the decision to Puerto Ricans.

Jordain Carney contributed to this report.