Migrant apprehensions slowing at southwest border: report

Migrant apprehensions slowing at southwest border: report
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The rate at which U.S. border authorities are apprehending foreign nationals crossing the southwest border without authorization dipped significantly in the first week of September, according to a report from NBC News.

The 21-day average number of detentions per day was 6,177 as of Friday, compared to 7,275 in mid-August, according to numbers obtained by the news outlet.

That indicates a slowdown in migration from Mexico and Central America, which had been rising consistently month to month in 2021, defying historical seasonal trends.

While the Department of Homeland Security has not released its August statistics on southwest border apprehensions, the 21-day average statistic suggests August numbers will be lower than July's.

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In July, border apprehensions set a 21-year monthly record high, with 212,672 apprehensions, continuing an unbroken upward trend that started in April 2020.

Although it's unlikely that the August drop-off will be dramatic, it comes at a time when the White House and Democrats in Congress are looking to grant permanent residency to a wide swath of immigrants who are not currently eligible to adjust their status.

The House Judiciary Committee is expected to approve the wording of immigration provisions to be included in the budget reconciliation bill that Democrats hope to pass without Republican support.

Immigrants who have entered the country without authorization during 2021 will, for the most part, not be eligible to become permanent residents under the bill and would remain undocumented immigrants unless they leave the country or successfully apply for asylum.

And the slowdown in unauthorized border crossings could be temporary, as Mexico has recently cracked down on migration through its territory, but internal circumstances could force a relaxation of enforcement measures.