Paul Ryan: Intel leaks 'the problem of the leaker, not the journalist'

Paul Ryan: Intel leaks 'the problem of the leaker, not the journalist'
© Greg Nash

Speaker of the House Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanGOP super PAC drops .5 million on Nevada ad campaign Blue wave poses governing risks for Dems Dems seek to rebuild blue wall in Rust Belt contests MORE (R-Wis.) defended journalists Friday, saying that while intelligence leaks compromise national security, it's "the problem of the leaker, not the journalist."

"Leaks are concerning because leaks can often compromise national security, but that’s the problem of the leaker not the journalist," Ryan said at an event in Muskego, Wis., on Friday afternoon.

Ryan's comment comes just hours after Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHillicon Valley: Trump cyber strategy lets US go on offense | AT&T urges court to let Time Warner merger stand | Conservatives want wife of DOJ official to testify | Facebook, nonprofits team up to fight fake news | DC camera hacker pleads guilty Vote Democrat in midterms to rein in Trump, preserve justice Sessions limits ability of judges to dismiss deportation cases MORE announced a governmentwide crackdown on leakers.

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Sessions warned that the media could be a part of that crackdown, and the Justice Department could ask for sources behind leaks. The investigation will include a review of the Justice Department's policies on subpoenas for media outlets that publish sensitive information.



“We respect the important role that the press plays and will give them respect, but it is not unlimited. They cannot place lives at risk with impunity,” Sessions said. “We must balance their role with protecting our national security and the lives of those who serve in our intelligence community, the armed forces and all law abiding Americans.”

“I have this message for the intelligence community: The Department of Justice is open for business,” he added. “And I have this warning for would-be leakers: Don’t do it.”

The top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerRussia docs order sets Trump on collision with intel community Hillicon Valley: North Korean IT firm hit with sanctions | Zuckerberg says Facebook better prepared for midterms | Big win for privacy advocates in Europe | Bezos launches B fund to help children, homeless Bipartisan trio asks US intelligence to investigate ‘deepfakes’ MORE (D-Va.), said on Thursday that Congress should probe the leak of transcripts of President Trump's phone calls with the leaders of Mexico and Australia, a leak both political parties have condemned.