Study: Rising seas may put US historical landmarks under water this century

Study: Rising seas may put US historical landmarks under water this century
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Rising sea levels could endanger thousands of important archaeological and historical sites in the next century, according to a new study from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The Washington Post reported the data, which found that global warming could result in sea levels rising by 3.3 feet by the year 2100, potentially threatening Jamestown in Virginia, the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and the tallest brick lighthouse in the U.S., in North Carolina.

Similar data published last year found that other world sites like Stonehenge and the Statue of Liberty could also be at risk.

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If sea levels continue to rise as projected, there could be a 16.4-foot increase in the next few centuries, submerging more than 32,000 archaeological sites, according to the researchers.

Earlier this year, President Trump rolled back an Obama-era policy that required tougher building standards for government-funded projects in areas at risk of rising sea levels.

Trump and key members of his administration have publicly expressed skepticism in the science behind climate change and have minimized the humans' impact on the phenomenom.

But a federal report published last month said that humans are the primary cause of climate change, including rising temperatures and sea levels.