Senate

Warren trying to ‘light the fire of urgency’ for Democrats

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) speaks during the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Tuesday, April 26, 2022.
Anna Rose Layden
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) speaks during the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Tuesday, April 26, 2022.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) says she is seeking to “light the fire of urgency” among her party ahead of the midterm elections.

“My job right now is to light the fire of urgency. We can’t waste a single day,” she said in an interview with Politico Tuesday, adding that the fact that Americans are struggling “creates an urgency that Democrats need to respond to. 

“That’s why we’re here,” the senator also said. “We’re not here to fight cultural wars. We’re here to make a real difference in the lives of people who need us.”

Warren has previously highlighted the importance of delivering on promises Democrats have made to contribute to “meaningful change” to spark action in voters.

“To put it bluntly: if we fail to use the months remaining before the elections to deliver on more of our agenda, Democrats are headed toward big losses in the midterms,” she wrote in a New York Times op-ed earlier this month

The former 2020 presidential candidate specifically referenced the Build Back Better agenda, the need to “abolish the filibuster” and the “cancellation” of a significant amount of student loan debt.

“Like many Americans, I’m frustrated by our failure to get big things done — things that are both badly needed and very popular with all Americans,” the Massachusetts Democrat also wrote. “While Republican politicians obstruct many efforts to improve people’s lives and many swear loyalty to the Big Lie, the urgency of the next election bears down on us.”

Meanwhile, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has voiced positivity about Republicans’ chances in the midterm elections, though he has noted it is possible for them to mess up without the right candidates.

“From an atmospheric point of view, it’s a perfect storm of problems for the Democrats,” McConnell said. “How could you screw this up? It’s actually possible. And we’ve had some experience with that in the past.” 

“In the Senate, if you look at where we have to compete in order to get into a majority, there are places that are competitive in the general election. So you can’t nominate somebody who’s just sort of unacceptable to a broader group of people and win. We had that experience in 2010 and 2012,” he added. 

Tags 2022 midterm elections Democratic Party Elizabeth Warren Elizabeth Warren Mitch McConnell

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