Establishment will pay at polls if Congress kills Trump's agenda

Establishment will pay at polls if Congress kills Trump's agenda
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This week marks the ninth anniversary of the enactment of the federal government’s infamous $700 billion bank bailout known as the Troubled Asset Relief Program. From the moment President George W. Bush signed the bill into law on Oct. 3, 2008, politics in America would never be the same. Our government’s willingness to bailout our nation’s leading financial institutions, the most wealthy and powerful among us, at hardworking taxpayer’s expense, kickstarted a new era of politics in America that started with the formation of the Tea Party in 2009 and culminated with the election of the ultimate political outsider, Donald Trump, as president in 2016. Fast forward to October 2017 and the movement continues with more ferocity than ever, because it seems Washington still hasn’t gotten the message.

The 2008 bailout serves as an exclamation point for the forgotten men and women in America, exemplified by the working folks in the Rust Belt, that Washington politicians in both parties were no longer looking out for their interests. The election of radical leftist and big government advocate President Obama only exacerbated the problem as the anti-Washington coalition of voters began to take shape in 2009. At the time of the bailout and Obama’s first election, our national debt stood at a once unthinkable $10 trillion.

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When the ObamaCare nightmare deemed and passed Congress, at the time led by Nancy Pelosi and Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidLobbying World Mitch McConnell is not invincible Seven big decisions facing Biden in 2020 primary MORE, in March 2010 using questionable means, that was enough to pave the way for the election of change agents senators like Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOn The Money: Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump | Trump to offer B aid package for farmers | House votes to boost retirement savings | Study says new tariffs to double costs for consumers Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump Hillicon Valley: Google delays cutting off Huawei | GOP senators split over breaking up big tech | Report finds DNC lagging behind RNC on cybersecurity MORE and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulO'Rourke: Trump 'provoking' war with Iran by sending troops to Middle East Overnight Defense: 1,500 troops heading to Mideast to counter Iran | Trump cites Iran tensions to push through Saudi arms sale | Senate confirms Army, Navy chiefs before weeklong recess Trump to send 1,500 troops to Middle East to counter Iran MORE, with Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOn The Money: Conservative blocks disaster relief bill | Trade high on agenda as Trump heads to Japan | Boeing reportedly faces SEC probe over 737 Max | Study finds CEO pay rising twice as fast as worker pay Conservative blocks House passage of disaster relief bill The Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan MORE following them shortly thereafter. While those victories were consequential, the Washington establishment was still determined to operate business as usual. Republicans went ahead and nominated Mitt Romney, who couldn’t appeal to the growing anti-Washington voters in the electoral vote rich states that mattered. Congress continued to pass unreadable spending bills worth billions and billions of dollars with little meaningful debate.

By April 2014, our national debt had exploded to $17 trillion and Trump made his appearance at the New Hampshire Freedom Summit talking about illegal immigration and border control as Congress steamed ahead and the “gang of eight” discussed amnesty. The Republican establishment started to fight back as they encouraged Democrats to vote for career politician Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranTop 5 races to watch in 2019 Bottom Line Races Dems narrowly lost show party needs to return to Howard Dean’s 50 state strategy MORE over conservative challenger Chris McDaniel in the Republican runoff for the U.S. Senate in Mississippi.

Even with the election of more conservative change agents like Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseFake Pelosi video sparks fears for campaigns Senate GOP votes to permanently ban earmarks The Hill's Morning Report - White House, Congress: Urgency of now around budget MORE and Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonGOP senator says Iran needs to 'stop acting like an outlaw' Sen. Tom Cotton: 'Memorial Day is our most sacred holiday' The Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan MORE to the Senate in 2014, the defenders of the status quo in Washington refused to open their eyes to what was happening across America. In June 2015, Trump entered the presidential race and the political class in Washington was repulsed. They would not take the Trump movement seriously even with the ouster of John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerK Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers Trump adviser expected to leave White House, join Juul The Hill's 12:30 Report: McGahn inflames Dem divisions on impeachment MORE as speaker by conservative congressman Mark Meadows and his Freedom Caucus.

Republican leaders in Congress continued to kick the can down the road on government spending and refused to stand up to the dangerous Obama agenda. Their excuse at the time was “wait until we have a Republican president” and then they would pass everything on the conservative agenda. In November 2016, the Republican leadership in Congress got their wish and a Republican was elected President of the United States. Trump supporters across the country were ready to see their agenda passed by Congress and signed into law by the new president. With the exception of the confirmation of Justice Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, the Republican-controlled Congress to date has not gotten the job done.

In early September, the national debt breached $20 trillion and the D.C. club didn’t blink an eye. They passed yet another debt ceiling increase and another three-month continuing resolution government spending bill, which is exactly the opposite of what the voters want. The White House’s frustration must be reaching the boiling point when you consider Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceMike Pence delivers West Point commencement address Dozens of graduates walk out in protest of Pence address Trudeau on tariff deal: Canadian and US businesses can get back to 'working constructively together' MORE’s chief of staff Nick Ayers recent remarks to major GOP donors that they should consider a purge of establishment Republicans in Congress who refuse to help pass the very agenda they campaigned on.

The coalition of anti-Washington voters around the country has taken notice. Judge Roy Moore’s victory in the recent U.S. Senate runoff election in Alabama is evidence that even with the election of President TrumpDonald John TrumpPapadopoulos on AG's new powers: 'Trump is now on the offense' Pelosi uses Trump to her advantage Mike Pence delivers West Point commencement address MORE, the Washington establishment continues with more business as usual. Nine years after the federal government’s $700 billion bailout, career politicians in Congress still haven’t listened, but maybe as primary season approaches voters will once again send them a message.

David N. Bossie is president of Citizens United and a contributor to Fox News. He served as President Donald Trump’s deputy campaign manager.