Establishment will pay at polls if Congress kills Trump's agenda

Establishment will pay at polls if Congress kills Trump's agenda
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This week marks the ninth anniversary of the enactment of the federal government’s infamous $700 billion bank bailout known as the Troubled Asset Relief Program. From the moment President George W. Bush signed the bill into law on Oct. 3, 2008, politics in America would never be the same. Our government’s willingness to bailout our nation’s leading financial institutions, the most wealthy and powerful among us, at hardworking taxpayer’s expense, kickstarted a new era of politics in America that started with the formation of the Tea Party in 2009 and culminated with the election of the ultimate political outsider, Donald Trump, as president in 2016. Fast forward to October 2017 and the movement continues with more ferocity than ever, because it seems Washington still hasn’t gotten the message.

The 2008 bailout serves as an exclamation point for the forgotten men and women in America, exemplified by the working folks in the Rust Belt, that Washington politicians in both parties were no longer looking out for their interests. The election of radical leftist and big government advocate President Obama only exacerbated the problem as the anti-Washington coalition of voters began to take shape in 2009. At the time of the bailout and Obama’s first election, our national debt stood at a once unthinkable $10 trillion.

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When the ObamaCare nightmare deemed and passed Congress, at the time led by Nancy Pelosi and Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDemocrats say Biden must get more involved in budget fight Biden looks to climate to sell economic agenda Justice Breyer issues warning on remaking Supreme Court: 'What goes around comes around' MORE, in March 2010 using questionable means, that was enough to pave the way for the election of change agents senators like Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeEconomy adds just 235K jobs in August as delta hammers growth Lawmakers flooded with calls for help on Afghanistan exit Afghanistan fiasco proves we didn't leave soon enough MORE and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate lawmakers let frustration show with Blinken Rand Paul: 'Hatred for Trump' blocking research into ivermectin as COVID-19 treatment Masks and vaccines: What price freedom? MORE, with Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSunday shows preview: Coronavirus dominates as country struggles with delta variant More than 10,000 migrants await processing under bridge in Texas Senators slow Biden with holds at Pentagon, State MORE following them shortly thereafter. While those victories were consequential, the Washington establishment was still determined to operate business as usual. Republicans went ahead and nominated Mitt Romney, who couldn’t appeal to the growing anti-Washington voters in the electoral vote rich states that mattered. Congress continued to pass unreadable spending bills worth billions and billions of dollars with little meaningful debate.

By April 2014, our national debt had exploded to $17 trillion and Trump made his appearance at the New Hampshire Freedom Summit talking about illegal immigration and border control as Congress steamed ahead and the “gang of eight” discussed amnesty. The Republican establishment started to fight back as they encouraged Democrats to vote for career politician Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Bottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE over conservative challenger Chris McDaniel in the Republican runoff for the U.S. Senate in Mississippi.

Even with the election of more conservative change agents like Ben SasseBen SassePresident of newly recognized union for adult performers boosts membership Romney blasts Biden over those left in Afghanistan: 'Bring them home' Progressives breathe sigh of relief after Afghan withdrawal MORE and Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonOvernight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by Climate Power — Senate Democrats ding Biden energy proposal MORE to the Senate in 2014, the defenders of the status quo in Washington refused to open their eyes to what was happening across America. In June 2015, Trump entered the presidential race and the political class in Washington was repulsed. They would not take the Trump movement seriously even with the ouster of John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLobbying world A new kind of hero? Last week's emotional TV may be a sign GOP up in arms over Cheney, Kinzinger MORE as speaker by conservative congressman Mark Meadows and his Freedom Caucus.

Republican leaders in Congress continued to kick the can down the road on government spending and refused to stand up to the dangerous Obama agenda. Their excuse at the time was “wait until we have a Republican president” and then they would pass everything on the conservative agenda. In November 2016, the Republican leadership in Congress got their wish and a Republican was elected President of the United States. Trump supporters across the country were ready to see their agenda passed by Congress and signed into law by the new president. With the exception of the confirmation of Justice Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, the Republican-controlled Congress to date has not gotten the job done.

In early September, the national debt breached $20 trillion and the D.C. club didn’t blink an eye. They passed yet another debt ceiling increase and another three-month continuing resolution government spending bill, which is exactly the opposite of what the voters want. The White House’s frustration must be reaching the boiling point when you consider Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard Pence'Justice for J6' organizer calls on demonstrators to respect law enforcement Ethics group files complaint against former Pence chief of staff Marc Short Pence aiming to raise M ahead of possible 2024 run: report MORE’s chief of staff Nick Ayers recent remarks to major GOP donors that they should consider a purge of establishment Republicans in Congress who refuse to help pass the very agenda they campaigned on.

The coalition of anti-Washington voters around the country has taken notice. Judge Roy Moore’s victory in the recent U.S. Senate runoff election in Alabama is evidence that even with the election of President TrumpDonald TrumpKinzinger says Trump 'winning' because so many Republicans 'have remained silent' Our remote warfare counterterrorism strategy is more risk than reward Far-right rally draws small crowd, large police presence at Capitol MORE, the Washington establishment continues with more business as usual. Nine years after the federal government’s $700 billion bailout, career politicians in Congress still haven’t listened, but maybe as primary season approaches voters will once again send them a message.

David N. Bossie is president of Citizens United and a contributor to Fox News. He served as President Donald Trump’s deputy campaign manager.