Q: More Q’s than A’s

Q: More Q’s than A’s
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When the first person asked me what I thought about “Q,” I had no idea what he was talking about. After a few more asked the same question, I looked to see who — or what — Q was.

The short version is that Q is the moniker for one or more anonymous posters using an online “bulletin board.” Because Q also is the name of a top-secret level of government security clearance, a lot of people speculate that Q is somebody with inside government information.

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Q posts things like:

“Timelines change.

Watch the budget.

Q”

And:

“Within a week of the last ‘BOOM’ set? 

What a coincidence.

Remember Southwest?

Remember TX?

Four?

BOOM BOOM BOOM BOOM

Q”

The cryptic Q postings began in October 2017. Since then they’ve captured the hearts and minds of an untold number of followers who pore through the material looking for wisdom, guidance and insight into today’s political environment, the Deep State, and all things Trump. They debate and discuss what Q means. They retweet the messages and make videos dissecting them.

“Those who scream the loudest ….

Find the connections.

1:1:1:1

Primary>>AffiliateA>>AffiliateB>>AffiliateC>>

Marching to the same beat?

Coincidence?

Logical thinking.

Q”

It’s tempting to want to believe in Q. What’s more intriguing than the thought of a high-level government insider leaking hints of secretive information? Someone who tells the public that random events are actually happening according to a master plan? Someone making sense of the incomprehensible, implying there’s hope to be found in seemingly hopeless situations?

“What happens if FISA fails or 'signers' cannot be trusted?

Who signed the CP FISA?

How do you keep something SECURE & SAFEGUARDED when those at the top of ABC depts are CORRUPT and being REMOVED? 

Q”

Q might be having a lot of fun gaining followers and starting conversations with his or her modified haiku. But, for me, the postings raise more questions than answers. I get the same feeling one gets when hearing a palm reader’s generic prognostications. Or when breaking open a fortune cookie and reading the paper message inside: “Someone close to you will provide long-awaited information.” You run through your mind to see if the predictions apply to something real in your life. Maybe you work a little bit to make them fit into a scenario you know to be true — though, deep down, you know the messages are usually vague and generic by design.

Q asks a lot of questions that readers are left to answer. Or provides “crumbs” and tells us that if we manage to do the right research, it might reveal a hidden, Great Truth. 

“Crumbs make bread.

Operations active.

Joint missions underway.

The world is fighting back.

Refer back to graphic.

The Great Awakening.

Snow White.

Iron Eagle.

Jason Bourne (2016)(Dream/CIA).

Q”

Like fortune-cookie wisdom, the meaning lies with the beholder. I find myself asking, why the mystery? It’s like ghosts that appear only as shadows seen out of the corner of the eye, the dearly departed who communicate only if special conditions are met through a selected medium, or a Ouija board occasionally spelling out staccato answers. Why so cagey? If there’s a real message or inside information, why not just provide it and remove any doubt? 

“Every C_A/MOS tactic of infiltration and internal disruption is being deployed on this board (central hub).

The World is Here.

Recognize.

This movement is bigger than anyone can possibly imagine.

Peace through strength.

Q”

All that having been said, I could be wrong about Q, so I’m hedging my analysis just in case. After all, nobody wants to be on the wrong side of a ghost, a Ouija board, or high-level government insider who’s leaking information to help us stitch together a great truth. 

“Compare & contrast.

1=1

Location of painting confirmed.

Travel to Rome.

Charms are very important.

Q

Or, as the Magic 8-Ball says: “Reply hazy, try again.”

Sharyl Attkisson (@SharylAttkisson) is an Emmy Award-winning investigative journalist, author of The New York Times bestsellers “The Smear” and “Stonewalled,” and host of Sinclair’s Sunday TV program, “Full Measure.”