Republicans should prepare for Nancy Pelosi to wield the gavel

Republicans should prepare for Nancy Pelosi to wield the gavel
© Greg Nash

Like a son who murders both his parents and then begs the court for mercy because he is an orphan, Senator Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Mueller report is a deterrent to government service Senate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Anti-smoking advocates question industry motives for backing higher purchasing age MORE is claiming that exploding budget deficits caused by Republican tax cuts need to be cured by cutting Social Security and Medicare. Can you say “chutzpah”?

With less than three weeks left until the midterms, McConnell may have just handed the Democrats the economic argument they had been longing for at the worst possible moment for the Republicans. According to the latest projections, the odds of Republicans retaining control of the House are fading. The number crunchers now peg the likelihood of a House controlled by Democrats at better than 83 percent.

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While the boomlet after the confirmation of Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughJuan Williams: Buttigieg already making history Dems plot next move in Trump tax-return battle Fight over census citizenship question hits Supreme Court MORE may have saved the Republican majority in the Senate, it may have run aground in the House battlegrounds. When Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Juan Williams: Racial shifts spark fury in Trump and his base Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign MORE is running in a dead heat and the seat held by Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanDems digging into Trump finances post-Mueller Overnight Health Care: DOJ charges doctors over illegal opioid prescriptions | Cummings accuses GOP of obstructing drug pricing probe | Sanders courts Republican voters with 'Medicare for All' | Dems probe funding of anti-abortion group Cummings accuses Oversight Republicans of obstructing drug price probe MORE is no longer “safe”, the president and his party have plenty to worry about. That was before the Senate majority leader stepped on a figurative grenade and signaled that he was ready to throw granny from a moving train to placate the donor gods.

Even as the 2020 presidential campaign for Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls Sri Lankan prime minister following church bombings Ex-Trump lawyer: Mueller knew Trump had to call investigation a 'witch hunt' for 'political reasons' The biggest challenge from the Mueller Report depends on the vigilance of everyone MORE vacuums up huge dollars, House Republicans are being treated like the neglected stepchildren of their party, being outraised and outspent by Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiTrump pushes back on impeachment talk: 'Tables are finally turning on the Witch Hunt!' Moulton enters 2020 White House race Trump takes aim at Dem talk of impeachment MORE and the Democrats at every turn. The latest campaign spending reports reveal that more than 70 Democratic House hopefuls have bested their Republican opponents in the race for campaign dollars.

The Democratic fundraising advantage appears to be historic, according to stats guru Nate Silver. This week, he tweeted: “Democrats have raised almost 2/3 of the total money for the House … Despite the fact that the GOP holds the incumbency advantage. Never been anything like that before in our House fundraising data, which goes back to 1998.”

The numbers fittingly tell the story. Democrat Max Rose bested incumbent Republican Dan Donovan by five to one in fundraising for Staten Island’s congressional seat. In New York’s Hudson Valley, Antonio Delgado, the Democratic challenger, raised $3.8 million in the last quarter. By comparison, John FasoJohn James FasoThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority GOP House super PAC targets two freshman Dems with new ads Tax law failed to save GOP majority MORE, the incumbent Republican representative in his first term, only added $1 million to his campaign coffers.

From the looks of things, it appears that Republicans are far more enchanted with their president than with the House Republican. It is also safe to say that only the Koch Brothers will miss Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAppeals court rules House chaplain can reject secular prayers FEC filing: No individuals donated to indicted GOP rep this cycle The Hill's Morning Report - Waiting on Mueller: Answers come on Thursday MORE when he is gone. To add insult to injury, McConnell inadvertently tossed the Democrats a lifeline just a day after Senator Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump pushes back on impeachment talk: 'Tables are finally turning on the Witch Hunt!' Warren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college Moulton enters 2020 White House race MORE decided to share with the world that her DNA proved that she was of fractional Native American descent. His remarks also followed hours after a federal judge dismissed the Stormy Daniels defamation suit against the president. Before our eyes, “Cocaine Mitch” was morphing into “Buzzkill McConnell.”

As to be expected, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee seized on McConnell’s comments, and the pile on began. Senator Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOn The Money: Inside the Mueller report | Cain undeterred in push for Fed seat | Analysis finds modest boost to economy from new NAFTA | White House says deal will give auto sector B boost Government report says new NAFTA would have minimal impact on economy Hillicon Valley: Washington preps for Mueller report | Barr to hold Thursday presser | Lawmakers dive into AI ethics | FCC chair moves to block China Mobile | Dem bill targets 'digital divide' | Microsoft denies request for facial recognition tech MORE weighed in: “Here’s what this means: SOCIAL SECURITY is on the ballot. MEDICARE is on the ballot. MEDICAID is on the ballot.” Not to be outdone, Warren gave a campaign lesson of her own: “Step 1: GOP explodes the deficit with $1.5 trillion in tax giveaways to wealthy donors. Step 2: GOP uses the deficit they created as an excuse to slash Social Security and Medicare.” As a matter of fact, this time she was persuasive.

If the tax cuts had trouble gaining traction with the public before McConnell’s pronouncement, they will face an even tougher slog now. Early on, the cuts were the bane of wealthy blue America as the legislation effectively ended the state and local tax deduction upon which many Californians and New Yorkers turned to for relief. Now the rest of the country can detest them as well and look forward to Election Day.

Even before McConnell’s proclamation, the cuts were rejected by voters by a double digit margin. Contrary to Republican hopes and promises, the cuts have once again failed to pay for themselves. Now America is being asked to foot the bill for the Republican gift to the donor class. Nancy Pelosi’s hands must be tingling. The Speaker’s gavel is within her reach.

Lloyd Green was the opposition research counsel to the George H.W. Bush campaign in 1988 and later served in the U.S. Department of Justice. He is now the managing member of research and analytics firm Ospreylytics.