'And the award for best political commentary by an Oscar nominee goes to...'

'And the award for best political commentary by an Oscar nominee goes to...'
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The who's who of Hollywood gather tonight for a civilized battle of talent, style and who can give the most social-media-worthy acceptance speech before being led offstage.

In this politically turbulent time, with its constant barrage of depressing news from Washington, Hollywood’s sympathies are well known, and often on very public display. What kind of fighting words might be uttered on national TV tonight? And what kind of retaliatory tweets will we see afterward? (There’s little doubt that most of the speeches won’t be complimentary of President TrumpDonald John Trump5 things to know about Boris Johnson Conservatives erupt in outrage against budget deal Trump says Omar will help him win Minnesota MORE.)

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The only thing to look forward to — other than an extra-long, glitzy snorefest, with all 24 categories being televised, #AllAwardsMatter — is the unexpected.

Here’s what some of the nominees think about Washington politics, based on what they’ve said at recent awards shows or in public, and what may come out of their mouths. 

“AND THE BEST POLITICAL-COMMENTARY OSCAR GOES TO ... ” 

Christian Bale, for Best Undercut Shot at Donald Trump’s Intelligence: "I think he thought I was Bruce Wayne, because I was dressed as Bruce Wayne. So he talked to me like I was Bruce Wayne and I just went along with it, really. It was quite entertaining. I had no idea at the time that he would think about running for president.”

Lady Gaga, for Most Pointed Anti-LGBT Concert Jab: "And to Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PencePence canceled New Hampshire trip to avoid contact with drug trafficker: report Human rights: Trump's trump card against China and North Korea Pence to push new NAFTA deal in visit to Iowa MORE, who thinks it's acceptable that his wife works at a school that ban LGBTQ, you're wrong. [...] You say we should not discriminate against Christianity. [...] I am a Christian woman, and what I do know about Christianity is that we bear no prejudice, and everybody is welcome.” 

Willem Dafoe, for Most Subtle Donald Trump Ego-Pop: "Our leader should be a moral leader, and I don't think we're going in the right direction, and we're a powerful country and we have a responsibility to the rest of the world. [...] In the rest of the world they think we're crazy and also, I think, the ’States has fallen in esteem." 

Spike Lee, for Best Trump Nickname of The Year: "Agent Orange, wake up! [...] He's a man of hate, violence and can't be trusted to make moral decisions. We can't be silent any more. He's on the wrong side of history.”

Viggo Mortensen, for Most Sarcastic Review of Donald Trump's Emergency Declaration: "I am sorry that we are missing the pearls of wisdom of our dear leader, ‘Agent Orange.’ It must have been fascinating theater.”

Alfonso Cuarón, for Best Comment on "The Wall": "The wall turns people into enemies for no reason. Walls are pointless. Whether there is a physical structure there or not, I'm more concerned with the invisible wall that divides social classes and backgrounds. That's a barrier we accept every day, without thinking.”

Emma Stone, for Best Humanitarian Remark: "I think if we're human beings, and we see injustice, we have to speak up, because staying silent, as they say, only really helps the oppressor. It never helps the victim. So I think that, yes, right now, I would hope that everyone, when seeing things being done that are absolutely unconstitutional and inhumane, would say something, anything. Whether it's at school or at an awards show or work, offices, or online."

Mahershala Ali, for Classiest, Most Nuanced Message: "When we get caught up in the minutiae and the details that make us different, I think there's two ways of seeing that. There's the opportunity to see the texture of that person, the characteristics that make them unique, and then there's an opportunity to go to war about it and say that this person is different from me. I don't like you, so let's battle."

Adam McKay, for Best Call-out of Money and the NRA in Politics: "If a lap dog could serve in Congress, they would do whatever the gun lobby wanted for a piece of bacon or a doggy treat. But lap dogs can't be elected to Congress, so the gun lobby got these shameless congressmen to sit and roll over for campaign checks. They are good little doggies who don't give a hang about the safety of innocent Americans. It's time they were finally recognized for their blind obedience to the almighty dollar!"

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Lady Gaga, again, for Best and Most Gun-Control Tweets, including: "This is terrorism plain and simple. Terror [bears] no race, gender or religion. Democrats & Republicans please unite now. #guncontrol."

Rami Malek, for Best Recognition of the Face of our Future: "Deeply inspiring and reassuring that these humans (Emma Gonzalez and other Parkland school-shooting survivors) are the face of our future."

Bradley Cooper, for Briefest Political Endorsement of a Presidential Candidate, referring to Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke calls Trump event 'almost an impromptu Nuremberg rally' after 'send her back' chants Biden's lead narrows in early voting states: poll New CBS poll shows Biden with 7-point lead in New Hampshire MORE (D-Texas): "I hope he runs. We need inspiration."

Rachel Weisz, for Best Dual-Citizen Commentary: "Trump is pretty catastrophic, and there are terrible things he can do to the Earth and women's rights, but I feel it will be reversible, somehow."

Regina King, for Best Pledge to Take Action for Women: "We all have the power as individuals to turn our complaints into action and our concerns into change. That's the message of the Time's Up campaign, and that's why I made a commitment during the Golden Globes to ensure that, within two years, women make up 50 percent of the crew for projects I produce. [...] This isn't simply a woman's issue. If you love your mama, then you need to be part of this movement!" 

Now, let's see how much of this passion makes it into the broadcast, or backstage.

Richard Greene is an author, columnist, radio host, political communications strategist and public speaker. Known as “The Civics Dean,” he is a former fellow at the Constitutional Rights Foundation, a former attorney, and the founder of 279 for Change, which advocates a new approach to engaging in politics. Follow him on Twitter @TheCivicsDean.