Klobuchar is a worthy candidate, getting no attention

Klobuchar is a worthy candidate, getting no attention
© Greg Nash

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Sanders defends vote against USMCA | China sees weakest growth in 29 years | Warren praises IRS move on student loans Poll: Sanders holds 5-point lead over Buttigieg in New Hampshire MORE (D-Minn.) has sterling credentials. She received an undergraduate degree from Yale University and a law degree from the University of Chicago (where one of her classmates was former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyNYT: Justice investigating alleged Comey leak of years-old classified info Bernie-Hillary echoes seen in Biden-Sanders primary fight Rosenstein on his time in Trump administration: 'We got all the big issues right' MORE). She served for eight years as the District Attorney for Hennepin County which includes Minneapolis and its suburbs. She is 58 and in her third term in the U.S. Senate.

Her legal background has served her well. She sits on the Senate Judiciary Committee, which recently heard testimony on the Mueller Report from Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrDems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Pentagon to place new restrictions, monitoring on foreign military students Parnas: Environment around Trump 'like a cult' MORE.

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Last week’s Judiciary Committee hearing on the Mueller Report illustrated the challenge facing Klobuchar’s presidential campaign. She aggressively and effectively questioned the attorney general. But the media coverage of the hearing was dominated by one of her rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSanders defends vote against USMCA: 'Not a single damn mention' of climate change The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial Overnight Energy: Schumer votes against USMCA, citing climate impact | Republicans offer details on their environmental proposals | Microsoft aims to be carbon negative by 2030 MORE (D-Calif.) who also serves on the committee. 

Klobuchar is playing Gayle KingGayle KingLifetime to release sequel to 'Surviving R. Kelly' Bloomberg attacks Biden's experience: 'He's never been the manager of an organization' Buttigieg riffs on Lizzo hit: 'I am 100 percent that nominee' MORE to Harris’ Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyTrump and Obama equally admired? Eight things popularity polls tell us Judge Judy rules in favor of Mike Bloomberg, will join him on campaign trail We must work to resist the culture of cruelty MORE. Harris raised more than twice as much money as the Klobuchar did in the first quarter of this year. Harris also has made a dent in national polls which Klobuchar has not been able to do.

Off to the races

To this point, Klobuchar’s candidacy has had little impact on the campaign to win the Democratic presidential nomination. She barely registers in the national polls. But she has raised enough money and has enough standing in the polls to qualify for the first Democratic presidential debate next month. 

A new national survey by the Washington Post and ABC News indicates that former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial Hillicon Valley: Biden calls for revoking tech legal shield | DHS chief 'fully expects' Russia to try to interfere in 2020 | Smaller companies testify against Big Tech 'monopoly power' Hill.TV's Krystal Ball on Sanders-Warren feud: 'Don't play to the pundits, play to voters' MORE leads the field with 39 percent of the vote only days after announcing that he would run for president. Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti rips Sanders over handling of feud with Warren On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Sanders defends vote against USMCA | China sees weakest growth in 29 years | Warren praises IRS move on student loans MORE (I-Vt.) came in second with 15 percent. Next in line were Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti rips Sanders over handling of feud with Warren On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Sanders defends vote against USMCA | China sees weakest growth in 29 years | Warren praises IRS move on student loans MORE (D-Mass.) at 8 percent, South Bend, Indi. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial Hill.TV's Krystal Ball on Sanders-Warren feud: 'Don't play to the pundits, play to voters' Poll: Sanders holds 5-point lead over Buttigieg in New Hampshire MORE at 7 percent, former Texas Congressman Beto O’Rourke at 6 percent and Kamala Harris at 5 percent. The other candidates including Klobuchar barely register at all.

Both Democratic front runners are men but 2020 could be the Year of the Woman in presidential politics. Politics like nature abhors a vacuum. The two male front runners have soft leads and a woman could easily charge into the vacuum if either of their candidacies falter. 

The conditions for the nomination of a woman are there.

Asset and liabilities

Klobuchar has a numbers problem. She is one of seven senators who are fighting to carry the Democratic presidential banner against Trump. She is one of four female Democratic senators in the race. She even shares her perch on the Senate Judiciary Committee with two other Democratic candidates, Harris and New Jersey Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDNC announces new criteria for New Hampshire debate The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders, Warren feud rattles Democrats The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial MORE.

The shaky start to Klobuchar’s presidential campaign is an example of the problems female candidates face. Before her official announcement, a story circulated that she had been abusive to staffers. There are 11 current members of Congress in the presidential race — six of whom are men. It wouldn’t be unusual if at least one of those six men had staff problems. But women are held to a stricter standard and Klobuchar took the media hit. People expect men to be tough, but women suffer when they come across anything but maternal.

Klobuchar describes herself as a pragmatic and moderate voice from the heartland of America. This may help her in neighboring Midwestern states like Iowa. Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSupreme Court agrees to hear 'faithless elector' cases Poll: Sanders holds 5-point lead over Buttigieg in New Hampshire Climate 'religion' is fueling Australia's wildfires MORE won in Minnesota by the skin of her teeth so Klobuchar has positioned herself as a Democrat who can win purple states like Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, all of which went to Trump in 2016.

But primary voters want some sizzle with their steak. She has focused on bipartisan issues like infrastructure development and opioid abuse. Klobuchar has distanced herself from many of the positions that excite Democratic primary voters. She does not support Medicare for All and calls the Green New Deal “aspirational.” Her approach to a free college education is typical. She said, “if I was a magic genie and could give that to everyone and we could afford it, I would.”

 

If one of the male candidates wins the Democratic presidential nomination, he will be under great pressure to select a female running mate to reflect the power of women in the Democratic Party. If she doesn’t win the nomination, Klobuchar would balance the ticket nicely. She represents a Midwestern swing state that is vital to a Democratic victory. Or perhaps, Democrats will make history with two women on the ticket in 2020.

Her service as a district attorney and as a member of the Judiciary Committee would certainly make her a better attorney general than William Barr, whose claim on history will be the man who sacrificed his legal integrity to act as Trump’s public defender.

Brad Bannon is a Democratic pollster and CEO of Bannon Communications Research. He is also the host of a radio podcast “Dateline D.C. With Brad Bannon” that airs on the Progressive Voices Network. Follow him on Twitter @BradBannon.

This is the 14th piece in a series of profiles by Bannon on 2020 Democratic hopefuls. Read his analysis on Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.), Sen. Cory Booker (D-New Jersey), Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.), Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio)Mayor Pete ButtigiegSen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s (D-N.Y.), former Rep. Beto O’Rourkeformer Govs. Jay Inslee and John Hickenlooper, former Vice President Joe BidenSen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), former HUD Secretary Julian CastroSen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)