Democratic debates don't need spectacle of live drawings and opinion hosts

Democratic debates don't need spectacle of live drawings and opinion hosts
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Televised presidential debates are very good for the cable news business. But are they becoming more about entertainment than informing voters on candidates? 

Take CNN's decision to do a live televised draw of the candidate lineup for the network’s upcoming debates. Draws like this are common with events like the NBA draft lottery, but something never seen before in modern politics.

As a result, the network risks another scenario where one night is crowded with top-tier candidates and the other is filled with politicians polling below 3 percent, as we saw in Miami on June 26 and 27. Those debates were hosted by NBC, MSNBC and Telemundo.

For a candidate like Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBiden: 'I'd add' Warren to my list of potential VP picks Warren says she made almost M from legal work over past three decades How can top Democrats run the economy with no business skill? MORE (D-Mass.), there can be real consequences from randomly choosing from the 20 Democratic candidates. She was picked to appear on June 26 with no real top-tier candidates alongside her. It's hard to draw a contrast with former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden: Buttigieg 'doesn't have significant black support even in his own city' Biden: 'I'd add' Warren to my list of potential VP picks How can top Democrats run the economy with no business skill? MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHow can top Democrats run the economy with no business skill? Biden rallies with John Kerry in early primary states Buttigieg campaign says 2000 people attended Iowa rally MORE (I-Vt.) if those candidates aren't even on stage. 

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Warren was left with punching down against those who have almost no chance at the nomination. The following night, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSunday shows — Nadler: A jury would convict Trump in 'three minutes flat' Booker on Harris dropping out: 'Iowa voters should have the right to choose' Booker campaign rakes in million after Harris exits 2020 race MORE (D-Calif.), who had been struggling in the polls while sitting in fourth or fifth place overall, hammered Biden directly and got the most ink after the debates.

There's also the issue with being forgotten in a span of just a few hours after the debate is over. Because thanks to the back-to-back format, candidates appearing on the second debate night will overshadow those from the night before, simply by happenstance. 

After night No. 1, there will be reviews and spin post-debate and into the morning. By the afternoon, however, the previews will already be prevalent for night No. 2. But after night No. 2, there are no more debates left to preview, giving the second night longer legs in the news cycle. 
 
The moderator selections have been faulty as well. Four of the moderators — Savannah Guthrie, Lester Holt, Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddChuck Todd challenges Cruz after senator pushes theory that Ukraine meddled in election Retiring House Democrat says a Trump reelection would be a 'nightmare scenario' for Congress Cruz on House impeachment inquiry: 'This is 'kangaroo court' MORE and José Diaz-Balart — work in the news divisions of NBC, MSNBC and Telemundo.

But rounding out its lineup, NBC chose Rachel MaddowRachel Anne MaddowCNN Pelosi town hall finishes third in cable news ratings race, draws 1.6M SNL mocks Buttigieg campaign's viral dance video as part of strategy to get 'a negative percentage of the black vote' The Hill's Morning Report - Sondland stuns; Dems pull punches in fifth debate MORE, a partisan opinion host. You may recall that Maddow — who is MSNBC's top-rated host — actually hugged Sanders and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWill the Horowitz report split the baby? Gabbard commemorates John Lennon's passing by singing 'Imagine' Bannon: Clinton waiting to enter 2020 race and 'save the Democratic Party from Michael Bloomberg' MORE on live television before a national television audience after a debate in 2016. 

CNN is now making the same mistake in choosing Don LemonDon Carlton LemonBiden urges senators to have 'courage' for impeachment trial Biden lashes out at Graham on Ukraine: 'I'm just embarrassed by what you're doing' CNN's Don Lemon: I'm not some partisan liberal Democrat MORE to moderate the debates, alongside Dana BashDana BashMeadows says Republican colleagues 'wrong' for suggesting Trump's phone call was inappropriate Judiciary Democrat: House impeaching Trump not a 'foregone conclusion' Judiciary Democrat who worked on Nixon impeachment says alleged Trump misconduct is worse MORE and Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperCNN Pelosi town hall finishes third in cable news ratings race, draws 1.6M Defense secretary fires Navy chief over SEAL war crimes case Democrats look to next steps in impeachment MORE. Lemon is listed as an anchor on CNN.com, but he is obviously one of the most opinionated people in cable news. Almost all of those opinions are anti-Trump.  

Lemon recently compared the president to Hitler and declared Trump to be a racist. And there's the time he called Trump "conman in chief" while mocking him for declaring bankruptcy over some of his casinos back in the '80s and early '90s. 

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So, why would CNN or NBC choose an opinion host to moderate? The decision opens the networks up to criticism, especially when considering there are plenty of hard-news journalists either network could tap for the role. 

NBC has Steve Kornacki, for example, who is as ensconced and knowledgeable as anyone in political media. He deserves a shot. As does CNN's Erin Burnett, who anchors a primetime program but has yet to moderate any primary debate, despite being on its air since 2011.   

In August 2015, more than 24 million tuned into Fox News for the first primary debate of the 2016 campaign season.

The recent Miami debates drew in 15.3 million and 18.1 million viewers, respectively.

Debates are very good business. But it doesn't have to be show business. 

Live draws and partisan opinion hosts need not be added. The interest is already there. 

Joe Concha is a media reporter for The Hill and co-host of "WOR Tonight with Joe Concha" weeknights on 710-WOR in New York. Follow Concha on Twitter @JoeConchaTV.