Trump's Super Tuesday results: Broad appeal beyond a united GOP

While some in the media spent much of Super Tuesday reveling in Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump renews culture war, putting GOP on edge Atlanta mayor says she has tested positive for COVID-19 Trump downplaying sparks new criticism of COVID-19 response MORE’s awakening from political death, they entirely missed the untold story of Super Tuesday: President Donald Trump’s record-breaking vote counts and turnout. 

Despite being an uncontested incumbent, President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Anderson Cooper: Trump's Bubba Wallace tweet was 'racist, just plain and simple' Beats by Dre announces deal with Bubba Wallace, defends him after Trump remarks Overnight Defense: DOD reportedly eyeing Confederate flag ban | House military spending bill blocks wall funding MORE managed to break several turnout and vote-count records in blue states and key swing states. 

In Vermont and Minnesota, Trump’s vote totals beat every past incumbent’s total in the last four decades. In Maine, the president’s vote total bested every primary candidate’s total since before President Ronald Reagan. In Massachusetts, the story was similar, with Trump aggregating a higher vote total than past incumbent Republicans since before Reagan. 

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And in deeply blue California, with 82 percent of precincts reporting, President Trump collected nearly 1.4 million votes. 

Turnout numbers similarly showcased the enthusiasm of Republican voters. In Colorado, for example, Republican turnout for Trump on Tuesday was greater than the past three Republican primaries combined.  

The evident enthusiasm for Trump was made clear in red states, in swing states, even in blue states on Tuesday evening, indicating that the Republican Party is more unified than ever before and is growing in numbers. 

Indeed, Tuesday night’s results are reflective of the data the Trump campaign collects in the lead-up to rallies. The campaign routinely finds that about a quarter of those who register to attend Trump rallies are Democrats and around 10 percent to 15 percent did not vote in 2016. 

For example, in Nevada – the most recent blue state where the Trump campaign held a rally – 27 percent of rally registrants were black or Latino and 32 percent of registrants overall did not vote in 2016. 

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Tuesday night’s results, combined with rally data, indicate that the Trump coalition is growing larger and is more energetic than ever before. 

Meanwhile, the Democratic Party is in complete disarray. Former Vice President Joe Biden is surging as Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersMilitary madness in the age of COVID-19 Will Twitter make @RealDonaldTrump a one-term president? Judd Gregg: The coming Biden coup MORE (I-Vt.) continues to collect a competitive number of delegates. The chaos on the left could very well materialize into a brokered convention in which party elites or super delegates could decide on the convention floor who the party’s nominee should be.  

With former South Bend, Ind., mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegDemocratic lawmakers call for expanding, enshrining LGBTQ rights Democrats debate Biden effort to expand map against Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Dems, GOP dig in on police reform ahead of House vote MORE and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: QAnon scores wins, creating GOP problem | Supreme Court upholds regulation banning robocalls to cellphones | Foreign hackers take aim at homebound Americans | Uber acquires Postmates Senate Democrats urge Pompeo to ensure Americans living overseas can vote in November The Hill's Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Reid Wilson says political winners are governors who listened to scientists and public health experts; 12 states record new highs for seven-day case averages MORE (D-Minn.) dropping out just before Super Tuesday and endorsing Biden, alongside former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas), it’s no wonder that Sanders supporters feel aggrieved at the idea of backroom deals depriving Sanders of the nomination. 

While Democrats duke it out in a chaotic process that could end in a floor fight in Milwaukee, and while many in the media ignore the energy behind the Trump movement, Republican voters remain coalesced behind the president. 

As some in the media spin the narrative of Democrats on the rise, many of the same pundits who found themselves stunned by President Trump’s victory on Nov. 8, 2016, will find themselves even more stunned on Nov. 3, 2020.

Kayleigh McEnany is the national press secretary for President Donald Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign. She was the former national spokesperson for the Republican National Committee and a former CNN political commentator. McEnany is the author of "New American Revolution: The Making of a Populist Movement."