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Trump's Super Tuesday results: Broad appeal beyond a united GOP

While some in the media spent much of Super Tuesday reveling in Joe BidenJoe BidenConfirmation hearing for Biden's DNI pick postponed Biden's Sunday inauguration rehearsal postponed due to security concerns: report Murkowski says it would be 'appropriate' to bar Trump from holding office again MORE’s awakening from political death, they entirely missed the untold story of Super Tuesday: President Donald Trump’s record-breaking vote counts and turnout. 

Despite being an uncontested incumbent, President TrumpDonald TrumpEx-Trump lawyer Cohen to pen forward for impeachment book Murkowski says it would be 'appropriate' to bar Trump from holding office again Man known as 'QAnon Shaman' asks Trump for pardon after storming Capitol MORE managed to break several turnout and vote-count records in blue states and key swing states. 

In Vermont and Minnesota, Trump’s vote totals beat every past incumbent’s total in the last four decades. In Maine, the president’s vote total bested every primary candidate’s total since before President Ronald Reagan. In Massachusetts, the story was similar, with Trump aggregating a higher vote total than past incumbent Republicans since before Reagan. 

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And in deeply blue California, with 82 percent of precincts reporting, President Trump collected nearly 1.4 million votes. 

Turnout numbers similarly showcased the enthusiasm of Republican voters. In Colorado, for example, Republican turnout for Trump on Tuesday was greater than the past three Republican primaries combined.  

The evident enthusiasm for Trump was made clear in red states, in swing states, even in blue states on Tuesday evening, indicating that the Republican Party is more unified than ever before and is growing in numbers. 

Indeed, Tuesday night’s results are reflective of the data the Trump campaign collects in the lead-up to rallies. The campaign routinely finds that about a quarter of those who register to attend Trump rallies are Democrats and around 10 percent to 15 percent did not vote in 2016. 

For example, in Nevada – the most recent blue state where the Trump campaign held a rally – 27 percent of rally registrants were black or Latino and 32 percent of registrants overall did not vote in 2016. 

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Tuesday night’s results, combined with rally data, indicate that the Trump coalition is growing larger and is more energetic than ever before. 

Meanwhile, the Democratic Party is in complete disarray. Former Vice President Joe Biden is surging as Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden to seek minimum wage in COVID-19 proposal Former Sanders spokesperson: Progressives 'shouldn't lose sight' of struggling Americans during pandemic 'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack MORE (I-Vt.) continues to collect a competitive number of delegates. The chaos on the left could very well materialize into a brokered convention in which party elites or super delegates could decide on the convention floor who the party’s nominee should be.  

With former South Bend, Ind., mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegAgency official says Capitol riot hit close to home for former Transportation secretary Chao Transportation Secretary Chao resigns in protest Buttigieg is blazing trails for LGBTQ equality MORE and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharGoogle completes Fitbit acquisition Hillicon Valley: Fringe social networks boosted after Capitol attack | Planned protests spark fears of violence in Trump's final days | Election security efforts likely to gain ground in Democrat-controlled Congress US Chamber of Commerce to stop supporting some lawmakers following the Capitol riots MORE (D-Minn.) dropping out just before Super Tuesday and endorsing Biden, alongside former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas), it’s no wonder that Sanders supporters feel aggrieved at the idea of backroom deals depriving Sanders of the nomination. 

While Democrats duke it out in a chaotic process that could end in a floor fight in Milwaukee, and while many in the media ignore the energy behind the Trump movement, Republican voters remain coalesced behind the president. 

As some in the media spin the narrative of Democrats on the rise, many of the same pundits who found themselves stunned by President Trump’s victory on Nov. 8, 2016, will find themselves even more stunned on Nov. 3, 2020.

Kayleigh McEnany is the national press secretary for President Donald Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign. She was the former national spokesperson for the Republican National Committee and a former CNN political commentator. McEnany is the author of "New American Revolution: The Making of a Populist Movement."