Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal

Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal
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Here are Trump-supporting women on Joe BidenJoe BidenFighting a virus with the wrong tools Trump bucks business on Defense Production Act Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — US coronavirus cases hit 100,000 | Trump signs T stimulus package | Trump employs defense powers to force GM to make ventilators | New concerns over virus testing MORE’s promise to name a woman as his vice president.

“It feels part contrived, part consolation prize,” for women defeated by Biden for the Democrats’ presidential nomination, Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayThe Memo: Economic disaster poses danger for Trump Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Overnight Health Care: Senate passes coronavirus aid bill, sending it to Trump | First lawmaker tests positive for coronavirus | Trump invokes defense law to boost response | Lawmakers push for surprise medical bill fix in package MORE told The Washington Post.

“Saying you’ll choose ‘a woman’ instead of naming a specific woman is wildly patronizing,” tweeted Karol Markowicz of the New York Post.

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Their dismissive view of Biden’s pledge to name a woman as his running mate is a hint of their likely distaste for his promise to nominate a black woman to the Supreme Court.

No black woman has ever been considered for the court, much less served there. Of the 114 people who have been on the bench since 1790, 108 have been white men. Over those 230 years, the exceptions have been two black men and four women. Three of those women are white and one, Sonia SotomayorSonia SotomayorSupreme Court rules states can eliminate insanity defense Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Biden should choose a Latina as his running mate MORE, is Hispanic.

For most of my life, the idea of a woman as vice president or a black woman sitting on the Supreme Court amounted to a progressive’s pipe dream.

The core of the GOP argument is that Biden is guilty of pandering to women instead of seeking the best qualified person for the job.

The air goes out of that putdown with a look at how President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump orders US troops back to active duty for coronavirus response Trump asserts power to decide info inspector general for stimulus gives Congress Fighting a virus with the wrong tools MORE handed the vice presidency and two court nominations to white men.

Trump’s Supreme Court nominees both came from a list provided by the conservative Federalist Society. Clearly, a consistent conservative political leaning — not simply top judicial qualifications — has been the determining factor for Trump.

The only time a woman was named as the Republican vice-presidential nominee — Sarah Palin in 2008 — few argued that her resumé made her the best qualified person for the job.

Palin was selected because the Alaska governor was a fresh voice and she generated excitement. But her lack of experience in national politics and foreign affairs — in other words, a lack of qualifications — became a burden on Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainJuan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Ernst calls for public presidential campaign funds to go to masks, protective equipment President Trump is right — Now's the time for 'all hands on deck' MORE’s (R-Ariz.) unsuccessful run for the White House.

Contrast Palin’s nomination with the female Democrats likely to be considered this time. Just look at the record of national political achievements from the four U.S. senators who ran for the nomination – Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Democratic Senators urge FTC to prevent coronavirus price gouging Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men MORE (Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Democratic Senators urge FTC to prevent coronavirus price gouging Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men MORE (Minn.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Democratic Senators urge FTC to prevent coronavirus price gouging Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men MORE (Mass.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandProgressive advocates propose T 'green stimulus' plan Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Cuomo steps into national spotlight with coronavirus fight MORE (N.Y.).

And beyond those political leaders, there are other supremely qualified women for the job among Democrats, beginning with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDC argues it is shortchanged by coronavirus relief bill Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — US coronavirus cases hit 100,000 | Trump signs T stimulus package | Trump employs defense powers to force GM to make ventilators | New concerns over virus testing Hillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike MORE (Calif.), Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinDemocratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Overnight Defense: 'Tens of thousands' of National Guard troops could be activated for coronavirus response | Hospital ships could take week to deploy | Trump says military to help Americans stuck in Peru MORE (Wis.) and Rep. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsCritics hit Florida governor over lack of 'sweeping' coronavirus response Biden says he has 'short list' of potential women for VP pick Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal MORE (D-Fla.).

The same is true of the wealth of well-qualified black women for Biden to nominate to the Supreme Court.

Biden has an array to put on his shortlist. It begins with Harris, who previously served as District Attorney of San Francisco and Attorney General of California. But it also includes Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia and Justice Leondra Kruger of the California Supreme Court.

Biden could even go out of the box with a political star with a Harvard Law School degree — former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaLobbying world Michelle Obama hosts from-home voter registration party with DJ D-Nice Budowsky: President Trump, meet with all former living presidents MORE.

The only lack of ‘qualification’ for these women is that they are not men.

And the U.S. has never had a woman serve as president or vice-president.

Keep in mind that the majority of the voters in at least the last five presidential elections have been female, and most of them cast their ballots for the Democrat.

A majority of women of color voted for the Democrat in each election — including 94 percent of black women in 2016.

But in all five elections, a majority of white women voted for the Republican presidential candidate. However, in the most recent national elections, white women have been trending away from Republicans.

In 2016, white women voted for the GOP by 11 percentage points but in 2018 they voted for Republicans and Democrats in equal numbers — 49 percent for each party.

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Exit polls from those midterm races found 59 percent of all women voted for the Democrat in that year’s congressional races compared to just 40 percent of women who voted Republican.

Note that when Democrats won those 41 seats, most were won by female candidates. The Democrats’ class of 2018 in Congress introduced the nation to a new generation of female leaders like Reps. Katie Porter (Calif.), Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOvernight Energy: Court upholds Trump repeal of Obama fracking rule | Oil price drop threatens fracking boom | EPA eases rules on gasoline sales amid coronavirus Ocasio-Cortez blasts coronavirus stimulus package as 'shameful' on House floor Oil price drop threatens US fracking boom MORE (N.Y.), Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinStates see surge of scams, price-gouging tied to pandemic Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Sanders looks to regain momentum in must-win Michigan MORE (Mich.) and Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerJuan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Security contractor Erik Prince reportedly recruited ex-spies to help Project Veritas infiltrate liberal groups Hillicon Valley: Barr offers principles to prevent online child exploitation | Facebook removes misleading Trump census ads | House passes bill banning TSA use of TikTok MORE (Va.).

So far, Biden’s primary campaign has succeeded by attracting the same suburban, white, moderate female voters who rewarded the Democrats with a House majority in 2018.

That why his promise to nominate a female vice president makes sense.

To use Biden’s famous hot-mic line from the Obama years, this is a “big f-in deal.” 

Juan Williams is an author, and a political analyst for Fox News Channel.