When will Americans — all Americans — declare that enough is enough?

When will Americans — all Americans — declare that enough is enough?
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On June 4, during a demonstration in Niagara Square in Buffalo, N.Y., protesting the death of George Floyd, a video recorded by a bystander revealed Martin Gugino approaching several police officers. Ordered to move on, Gugino was then pushed and fell to the ground; seconds later, blood began gushing from his head. Gugino was hospitalized in “fair condition.” The Erie County District Attorney subsequently charged two of the officers with second-degree criminal assault.

On June 9, President Trump tweeted a baseless conspiracy theory: “Buffalo protestor shoved by Police could be an ANTIFA provocateur. 75 year old Martin Gugino was pushed away after appearing to scan police communications in order to black out the equipment… I watched, he fell harder than was pushed. Was aiming scanner. Could be a set up?”

At his daily coronavirus briefing, Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoReopening schools seen as vital step in pandemic recovery Chicago mayor issues emergency travel advisory for those coming from states with coronavirus surges Chamber of Commerce, trade groups call for national standard on requiring masks MORE, the Democratic governor of New York, denounced the tweet: “How reckless, how irresponsible, how mean, how crude… You think the blood coming out of his head was staged? Is that what you are saying?”

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The silence from Republican office holders in Washington, however, has been deafening. The White House and chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsAtlanta airport checkpoint closed after worker tests positive for coronavirus House Republicans urge White House to support TSA giving travelers temperature checks The Hill's Morning Report - Republicans shift, urge people to wear masks MORE declined to comment.

To her credit, Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenators will have access to intelligence on Russian bounties on US troops Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police Senators push to limit transfer of military-grade equipment to police MORE (R-Alaska) told reporters: “I just saw that this second. It just makes no sense that we’re fanning the flames right at this moment.” The responses of many of her colleagues, however, were cringeworthy. Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerTrump nominee faces Senate hurdles to securing public lands post The Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue The Hill's Morning Report - Republicans shift, urge people to wear masks MORE (R-Colo.) and Sen. John CornynJohn CornynSenators push foreign media to disclose if they are registered as foreign agents GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday New legislation required to secure US semiconductor leadership MORE (R-Texas) indicated they had not read Trump’s tweet. Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioCongress eyes tighter restrictions on next round of small business help Trump administration eyes new strategy on COVID-19 tests ACLU calls on Congress to approve COVID-19 testing for immigrants MORE (R-Fla.) said he had “no information about that man or who he is.” Sen. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerGOP skeptical of polling on Trump Senate passes sanctions bill targeting China over Hong Kong law Cruz urges Trump to support Israeli annexation MORE (R-N.D.) claimed he knew “nothing of the episode.” Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCongress eyes tighter restrictions on next round of small business help The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Stagwell President Mark Penn says Trump is losing on fighting the virus; Fauci says U.S. 'going in the wrong direction' in fight against virus GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday MORE (R-Maine), who had predicted that Trump had learned from his impeachment and “will be much more cautious in the future,” seemed to shrug yet again, opining that “It would be best if the president did not comment on issues that are before the courts.” Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump administration grants funding extension for Texas testing sites Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down GOP lawmakers join social media app billed as alternative to Big Tech MORE (R-Texas), who had had quite a lot to say when Donald Trump retweeted an accusation that Cruz’s father was involved in the assassination of John F. Kennedy, declared “I don’t comment on the tweets.” Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) said, “I haven’t read the damn thing. I don’t want to hear it.”

A masked Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPublic awareness campaigns will protect the public during COVID-19 Democrats: A moment in history, use it wisely 'Comrade' Trump gets 'endorsement' from Putin in new mock ad by Lincoln Project MORE (R-Ky.), the Senate majority leader, marched resolutely past reporters without responding to their questions.

Trump’s baseless smear of a private citizen, of course, is scarcely the only time in the last four years — or even in June 2020 — that Republicans on the Hill have suddenly become mute.

When peaceful protestors near the White House were forcibly dispersed (perhaps on orders by Attorney General William BarrBill BarrDemocrat asks Barr to preserve any records tied to environmental hacking probe Justice Dept. considering replacing outgoing US attorney in Brooklyn with Barr deputy: report Ousted Manhattan US Attorney Berman to testify before House next week MORE) on June 1, to clear the way for the president to walk to St. John’s Church for a photo op, only Sens. Murkowski and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyQAnon scores wins, creating GOP problem Republicans fear backlash over Trump's threatened veto on Confederate names Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police MORE (R-Utah) condemned the action. The irredeemably wishy-washy Sen. Collins indicated that she had “a lot of respect for” for Gen. Jim Mattis, former secretary of Defense who blasted Trump for misusing the military, but Collins would not say whether she agreed with Mattis’s criticism of the president.

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The lambs were silent as well a few days later when Trump celebrated a decline in unemployment by hoping that “George [Floyd] is looking down right now and saying this is a great thing that is happening for our country. There’s a great day for him… It’s the greatest thing that can happen for race relations, for the African American community… for everything.”

When will Americans — all Americans — declare that enough is enough?

When will they stop excusing, enabling, or defending words  and behavior they would reject in any other public official, or — for that matter — in any other human being?

Glenn C. Altschuler is the Thomas and Dorothy Litwin Professor of American Studies at Cornell University. He is the co-author (with Stuart Blumin) of Rude Republic: Americans and Their Politics in the Nineteenth Century.