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When will Americans — all Americans — declare that enough is enough?

When will Americans — all Americans — declare that enough is enough?
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On June 4, during a demonstration in Niagara Square in Buffalo, N.Y., protesting the death of George Floyd, a video recorded by a bystander revealed Martin Gugino approaching several police officers. Ordered to move on, Gugino was then pushed and fell to the ground; seconds later, blood began gushing from his head. Gugino was hospitalized in “fair condition.” The Erie County District Attorney subsequently charged two of the officers with second-degree criminal assault.

On June 9, President Trump tweeted a baseless conspiracy theory: “Buffalo protestor shoved by Police could be an ANTIFA provocateur. 75 year old Martin Gugino was pushed away after appearing to scan police communications in order to black out the equipment… I watched, he fell harder than was pushed. Was aiming scanner. Could be a set up?”

At his daily coronavirus briefing, Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoFoo Fighters, Dave Chapelle cover 'Creep' at first MSG show since pandemic Katie Hill says 'it would take a lot' to convince her to run again for House New York City moving thousands of people from hotels back to shelters MORE, the Democratic governor of New York, denounced the tweet: “How reckless, how irresponsible, how mean, how crude… You think the blood coming out of his head was staged? Is that what you are saying?”

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The silence from Republican office holders in Washington, however, has been deafening. The White House and chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsHead of firms that pushed 'Italygate' theory falsely claimed VA mansion was her home: report The Hill's Morning Report - Dems to go-it-alone on infrastructure as bipartisan plan falters Trump, allies pressured DOJ to back election claims, documents show MORE declined to comment.

To her credit, Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Democrats facing tough reelections back bipartisan infrastructure deal Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (R-Alaska) told reporters: “I just saw that this second. It just makes no sense that we’re fanning the flames right at this moment.” The responses of many of her colleagues, however, were cringeworthy. Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (R-Colo.) and Sen. John CornynJohn CornynProgressive groups launch .5M ad buy to pressure Sinema on filibuster Black lawmakers warn against complacency after Juneteenth victory The Senate is where dreams go to die MORE (R-Texas) indicated they had not read Trump’s tweet. Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense: Senate panel delays Iraq war powers repeal | Study IDs Fort Hood as least-safe base for female soldiers | Pentagon loosens some COVID-19 restrictions Senate panel delays war authorization repeal after GOP push Eliminate family and child poverty: Richard Nixon may help in today's debate MORE (R-Fla.) said he had “no information about that man or who he is.” Sen. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerSenate confirms Radhika Fox to lead EPA's water office GOP senator introduces constitutional amendment to ban flag burning Trump dismisses climate change, calls on Biden to fire joint chiefs MORE (R-N.D.) claimed he knew “nothing of the episode.” Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Democratic clamor grows for select committee on Jan. 6 attack Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (R-Maine), who had predicted that Trump had learned from his impeachment and “will be much more cautious in the future,” seemed to shrug yet again, opining that “It would be best if the president did not comment on issues that are before the courts.” Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Republicans: Newly proposed ATF rules could pave way for national gun registry DeSantis tops Trump in 2024 presidential straw poll White House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine MORE (R-Texas), who had had quite a lot to say when Donald Trump retweeted an accusation that Cruz’s father was involved in the assassination of John F. Kennedy, declared “I don’t comment on the tweets.” Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) said, “I haven’t read the damn thing. I don’t want to hear it.”

A masked Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats go down to the wire with Manchin Schumer unloads on GOP over elections bill: 'How despicable of a man is Donald Trump?' This week: Senate set for voting rights fight MORE (R-Ky.), the Senate majority leader, marched resolutely past reporters without responding to their questions.

Trump’s baseless smear of a private citizen, of course, is scarcely the only time in the last four years — or even in June 2020 — that Republicans on the Hill have suddenly become mute.

When peaceful protestors near the White House were forcibly dispersed (perhaps on orders by Attorney General William BarrBill BarrFederal judge rules Barr, other officials have qualified immunity from suit over Lafayette Square protests Lieu calls Catholic bishops 'hypocrites' for move to deny Biden communion The Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? MORE) on June 1, to clear the way for the president to walk to St. John’s Church for a photo op, only Sens. Murkowski and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyOvernight Defense: Senate panel delays Iraq war powers repeal | Study IDs Fort Hood as least-safe base for female soldiers | Pentagon loosens some COVID-19 restrictions Senate panel delays war authorization repeal after GOP push Eliminate family and child poverty: Richard Nixon may help in today's debate MORE (R-Utah) condemned the action. The irredeemably wishy-washy Sen. Collins indicated that she had “a lot of respect for” for Gen. Jim Mattis, former secretary of Defense who blasted Trump for misusing the military, but Collins would not say whether she agreed with Mattis’s criticism of the president.

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The lambs were silent as well a few days later when Trump celebrated a decline in unemployment by hoping that “George [Floyd] is looking down right now and saying this is a great thing that is happening for our country. There’s a great day for him… It’s the greatest thing that can happen for race relations, for the African American community… for everything.”

When will Americans — all Americans — declare that enough is enough?

When will they stop excusing, enabling, or defending words  and behavior they would reject in any other public official, or — for that matter — in any other human being?

Glenn C. Altschuler is the Thomas and Dorothy Litwin Professor of American Studies at Cornell University. He is the co-author (with Stuart Blumin) of Rude Republic: Americans and Their Politics in the Nineteenth Century.