Player of the Week: ObamaCare

ObamaCare is once again in the spotlight. But then again, has it ever really left the political stage since its passage three years ago?

Enrollment in ObamaCare starts Tuesday, though the law has recently been attracting headlines for other reasons.

ADVERTISEMENT
 It has been at the center of the battle on funding the government and it surely will be discussed in the debt-limit debate. Democrats note that the Affordable Care Act has survived a Supreme Court challenge and the 2012 presidential election. Republicans say the law is hurting the economy and is financially unsustainable.

 Confusion remains over ObamaCare — nearly 75 percent of Americans are somewhat worried they will have to pay more for their healthcare, according to an NBC/Kaiser Family Foundation poll.

 Some on the left point out that there was fear and confusion before the Medicare prescription drug benefit was implemented in 2006. There were some glitches, but the program is now widely popular. Democrats predict that will happen with ObamaCare as well.

 Certainly, 2016 politics is at play on how Republicans are dealing with the healthcare reform law.

 Sens. Ted CruzTed CruzHow 'Big Pharma' stifles pharmaceutical innovation AIPAC must reach out to President Trump Under pressure, Dems hold back Gorsuch support MORE (R-Texas), Marco RubioMarco RubioSenators introduce new Iran sanctions Senate intel panel has not seen Nunes surveillance documents: lawmakers With no emerging leaders, no clear message, Democrats flounder MORE (R-Fla.), Mike LeeMike LeeGOP senators pitch alternatives after House pulls ObamaCare repeal bill How 'Big Pharma' stifles pharmaceutical innovation Overnight Finance: Senators spar over Wall Street at SEC pick's hearing | New CBO score for ObamaCare bill | Agency signs off on Trump DC hotel lease MORE (R-Utah) and Rand PaulRand PaulTrump, GOP fumble chance to govern GOP senators pitch alternatives after House pulls ObamaCare repeal bill Rand Paul takes victory lap on GOP health bill MORE (R-Ky.) have led the charge against ObamaCare. All except Lee are considering a White House run in 2016.

 In the mid-1990s, then-President Clinton outflanked the GOP during two government shutdowns. Republicans believe it will be different this time, especially because Democrats have rejected a succession of GOP bills that would fund the government and because President Obama is refusing to negotiate fiscal concessions that could be part of any agreement to raise the federal debt limit.

 A government shutdown and/or default is politically risky for both parties.

 During a House Rules Committee hearing on Monday, Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-Fla.) lamented the looming shutdown and predicted both parties would be negatively affected in the 2014 elections.

 “It is a sad day for America,” Hastings said.