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Stop the tariff madness

Stop the tariff madness
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President TrumpDonald TrumpSacha Baron Cohen calls out 'danger of lies, hate and conspiracies' in Golden Globes speech Sorkin uses Abbie Hoffman quote to condemn Capitol violence: Democracy is 'something you do' Ex-Trump aide Pierson planning run for Congress MORE this morning tweeted, “Tariffs are the greatest!” He added that a country that he deems has “treated the United States unfairly” on trade should negotiate a fair deal or it will get hit with tariffs. “Remember, we are the ‘piggy bank’ that’s being robbed.”

With all due respect, he is exceedingly wrong. Tariffs are taxes, and there is nothing great about them. Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyForeign perpetrators among fraudsters shamming state's unemployment systems Biden nominee previews post-Trump trade agenda New CDC guidance ends up deepening debate over reopening schools MORE, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, recently said, “Tariffs are taxes. Lower is better and zero is always the best.” The father of modern economics, Adam SmithDavid (Adam) Adam SmithBiden seeks to walk fine line with Syria strike Overnight Defense: Biden sends message with Syria airstrike | US intel points to Saudi crown prince in Khashoggi killing | Pentagon launches civilian-led sexual assault commission The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Divided House on full display MORE, explained this concept in “The Wealth of Nations,” writing, “In every country it always is and must be the interest of the great body of the people to buy whatever they want of those who sell it cheapest.”

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Trade is not a win or lose proposition. Every American benefits from trade through competition and lower prices. We should strive for a world free of tariffs. Imposing new ones not only moves us further from that goal, it also harms Americans in a misguided attempt to penalize other countries for their own misguided economic policies. When China, Canada, Mexico, or the European Union imposes tariffs on American goods, subsidizes their own exports, or devalues their currency, they do so only at the expense of their own citizens. Their economies are held back, subsidizing otherwise unprofitable and busywork ventures, while Americans benefit from cheaper imports and are free to innovate and produce higher order goods and services.

In addition, trade deficits, though ominous sounding, are not a problem. In fact, a trade deficit is a sign of a healthy economy that is generating significant wealth. Trade deficits are the combined result of Americans having significant purchasing power in the world market and the desire for foreigners to invest in America. Every dollar spent on imports, or robbed from the “piggy bank,” will find its way home to buy American products or invest in American companies. If the trade deficit were true cause for concern, then we ought to ban imports and foreign investment altogether, but then President Trump would not be able to tout economic projects such as the Foxconn plant in Wisconsin.

Unfortunately, economic nationalists in this administration fail to grasp these concepts, and their inability to understand the benefits of trade have hurt our economy. The Tax Foundation has analyzed the tariffs imposed by the administration. The findings are alarming, showing $15.68 billion in lost gross domestic product (GDP) and 48,585 jobs. If the administration were to move forward with proposed tariffs, the negative impact would be substantially greater. GDP would decline by nearly $90 billion and 277,825 jobs would be lost. Retaliatory tariffs imposed by our trading partners would cost another $12.38 billion in GDP and 38,376 jobs.

The economic benefits of the Tax Jobs and Jobs Act, which was signed into law by President Trump late last year and hailed as the biggest legislative accomplishment of his administration, would be significantly diminished. The Tax Foundation notes these tariffs would reduce impact of the tax cuts by 25 percent. This is a self-inflicted wound and history clearly demonstrates how severe it could be. In 1930, more than 1,000 economists signed a letter to President Hoover and Congress urging them to kill the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act. They were ignored, and by 1934 total global trade was only a third of the level it was in 1929. Today, the extent of the economic debate is whether the Smoot-Hawley tariffs merely worsened the Great Depression or actually caused it.

Congress can stop this madness. The Constitution gives sole authority over trade to the legislative branch. Over time, Congress has unwisely ceded this power to the executive branch. The administration has taken this authority through Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act, which allows an administration to impose tariffs or adjust import levels for national security purposes, to impose these tariffs on the specious argument that the security of the United States is somehow threatened.

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeCPAC, all-in for Trump, is not what it used to be OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Key vote for Haaland's confirmation | Update on oil and gas leasing | SEC update on climate-related risk disclosure requirements Haaland on drilling lease moratorium: 'It's not going to be a permanent thing' MORE (R-Utah) and Rep. Warren DavidsonWarren Earl DavidsonREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Top GOP lawmakers call for Swalwell to be removed from Intelligence Committee House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit MORE (R-Ohio) have introduced the Global Trade Accountability Act to restore the legislative branch’s role in trade policy. The bill would require congressional authorization for any unilateral trade action, including adjustments in import levels or the imposition of tariffs. Similarly, Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerIt's time for Biden's Cuba GOP lawmaker patience runs thin with Trump tactics Former GOP senator: Republicans cannot let Trump's 'reckless' post-election claims stand MORE (R-Tenn.) and Rep. Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John GallagherLawmakers to roll out legislation reorganizing State cyber office House Republicans gear up for conference meeting amid party civil war Back to the future: America must renew its commitment to scientific inquiry MORE (R-Wis.) have introduced legislation that would require congressional approval for adjustments of import levels or unilateral tariffs under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act.

Congress does not have to sit idly by and watch this madness. When President Obama was in office, Republicans routinely called for the reclamation of Article I powers to serve as a check on destructive economic policies. Control of the White House may have changed hands, but the urgency of check and balances remains the same. There must be strong action to restore the role of Congress on trade.

Jason Pye is the vice president of legislative affairs for FreedomWorks. Patrick Hedger is the director of policy for FreedomWorks.