Rand Paul’s Russia visit displays advancement of peace through diplomacy

Rand Paul’s Russia visit displays advancement of peace through diplomacy
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Dialogue is the cornerstone of peace.

Earlier this week Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulCNN catches heat for asking candidates about Ellen, Bush friendship at debate Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Trump isolated amid Syria furor | Pompeo, Pence to visit Turkey in push for ceasefire | Turkish troops advance in Syria | Graham throws support behind Trump's sanctions Rand Paul rips Lindsey Graham: 'Wrong about almost every foreign policy decision' MORE (R-Ky.) delivered a letter from President Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren defends, Buttigieg attacks in debate that shrank the field Five takeaways from the Democratic debate in Ohio Democrats debate in Ohio: Who came out on top? MORE to Russian President Vladimir Putin. As he continues his visit, Rand is advocating for open dialogue and communication between the U.S. and Moscow.

“Our biggest issue right now is that there is no dialogue,” Rand told CNN on Tuesday.

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While his push for open dialogue has garnered criticism from both sides of the aisle, Rand touches upon a key component of successful foreign policy: communication.

 

Republican Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMeghan McCain: It's 'breaking my heart' Warren is leading Biden in the polls The Hill's 12:30 Report: Video depicting Trump killing media, critics draws backlash Backlash erupts at video depicting Trump killing media, critics MORE (R-Ariz.) has ferociously advocated against any diplomatic communication with Moscow.


On the other hand, Robby Mook, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWarren defends, Buttigieg attacks in debate that shrank the field Democrats fear Ohio slipping further away in 2020 Poll: Warren leads Biden in Maine by 12 points MORE’s 2016 presidential campaign manager argues that Russia wants Democrats divided and will disrupt their primary.

Communication and open dialogue beget resolution in all instances of policy, foreign or domestic. To shut ourselves off from opening lines of communication with Moscow because of deep seated antagonism and a stubborn desire to stay as far away from Russia as possible will only serve to hurt American interests.

That antagonism is rooted largely in part due to a mindset established during the Cold War that pervaded society. “Beware the hammer and sickle”, a Cold War slogan is still seen as a warning by many. 

In an interview last month, Kentucky Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieO'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats Scalise blasts Democratic legislation on gun reforms Airports already have plenty of infrastructure funding MORE (R-Ky. noted that we have more than just the options of going to a full-on war or a cold war or sanctions: diplomacy is also an option.

“...the GOP establishment and pretty much all of the liberals at this point...they completely underestimate the value of just talking to your would-be adversaries, but that doesn’t make anyone money in Washington, DC,” Rep. Massie told Breitbart.

“Those who believe in either country that we should not have diplomacy are greatly mistaken”, said Paul.

Paul and Massie are in the minority in Washington because they truly believe in war as the last resort. They understand that war means American lives lost and they should take every precaution to avoid war, while still maintaining a strong national defense. 

Unfortunately, establishment, DC elites are driven by special interests and lobbyists, failing to do what is best for their constituents and the American people.

Let’s take a look at sanctions, the new buzzword surrounding Russia. Last week a Bipartisan Senate sought to push forward a bill that calls for “crushing” sanctions designed to punish Russia over alleged election meddling. But what purpose do these sanctions really serve?

Last year, Paul said sanctions towards Russia were “akin to tweaking their nose” and we need to focus on other issues such as improving cyber-security in the US.

That same sentiment still holds true today. Imposing any unjust sanctions on Russia that in turn serve to weaken Russia’s economy is not in our interest. Sanctions will only further deter dialogue between Moscow and Washington, thereby pushing us further away from the diplomatic resolutions that would be in everyone’s best interests.

Instead, we must move away from antiquated Cold War thinking and look forward to a state of peace inspired by diplomacy.

Summed up brilliantly by Dr. Martin Luther King, “Wars are poor chisels for carving out peaceful tomorrows.”

He’s right. 

Call your elected officials in D.C. Tell them they should stand up to the lobbyists, stop the warmongering fear tactics, and to stand with the American people by supporting peace. 

Cliff Maloney Jr. is the president of Young Americans for Liberty (YAL). He served as National Youth Director for the Rand Paul presidential campaign.