Rand Paul’s Russia visit displays advancement of peace through diplomacy

Rand Paul’s Russia visit displays advancement of peace through diplomacy
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Dialogue is the cornerstone of peace.

Earlier this week Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTop White House aide shares cartoon mocking Fauci 'Live with it' is the new GOP response to COVID — but no, we can't do that Koch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads MORE (R-Ky.) delivered a letter from President Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpWayfair refutes QAnon-like conspiracy theory that it's trafficking children Stone rails against US justice system in first TV interview since Trump commuted his sentence Federal appeals court rules Trump admin can't withhold federal grants from California sanctuary cities MORE to Russian President Vladimir Putin. As he continues his visit, Rand is advocating for open dialogue and communication between the U.S. and Moscow.

“Our biggest issue right now is that there is no dialogue,” Rand told CNN on Tuesday.

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While his push for open dialogue has garnered criticism from both sides of the aisle, Rand touches upon a key component of successful foreign policy: communication.

 

Republican Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMcCain's reset: US-Vietnam relations going strong after 25 years Senate outlook slides for GOP Juan Williams: Time for boldness from Biden MORE (R-Ariz.) has ferociously advocated against any diplomatic communication with Moscow.


On the other hand, Robby Mook, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: Wells Fargo tells employees to delete TikTok from work phones | Google, Facebook join legal challenge to ICE foreign students rule | House Republican introduces bills to bolster federal cybersecurity Biden lets Trump be Trump 4 Texas GOP congressional primary runoffs to watch MORE’s 2016 presidential campaign manager argues that Russia wants Democrats divided and will disrupt their primary.

Communication and open dialogue beget resolution in all instances of policy, foreign or domestic. To shut ourselves off from opening lines of communication with Moscow because of deep seated antagonism and a stubborn desire to stay as far away from Russia as possible will only serve to hurt American interests.

That antagonism is rooted largely in part due to a mindset established during the Cold War that pervaded society. “Beware the hammer and sickle”, a Cold War slogan is still seen as a warning by many. 

In an interview last month, Kentucky Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieBiggs, Massie call on Trump to remove troops from Afghanistan Massie wins House GOP primary despite Trump call to be ousted from party Rep. Massie called out by primary opponent for previous display of Confederate flag MORE (R-Ky. noted that we have more than just the options of going to a full-on war or a cold war or sanctions: diplomacy is also an option.

“...the GOP establishment and pretty much all of the liberals at this point...they completely underestimate the value of just talking to your would-be adversaries, but that doesn’t make anyone money in Washington, DC,” Rep. Massie told Breitbart.

“Those who believe in either country that we should not have diplomacy are greatly mistaken”, said Paul.

Paul and Massie are in the minority in Washington because they truly believe in war as the last resort. They understand that war means American lives lost and they should take every precaution to avoid war, while still maintaining a strong national defense. 

Unfortunately, establishment, DC elites are driven by special interests and lobbyists, failing to do what is best for their constituents and the American people.

Let’s take a look at sanctions, the new buzzword surrounding Russia. Last week a Bipartisan Senate sought to push forward a bill that calls for “crushing” sanctions designed to punish Russia over alleged election meddling. But what purpose do these sanctions really serve?

Last year, Paul said sanctions towards Russia were “akin to tweaking their nose” and we need to focus on other issues such as improving cyber-security in the US.

That same sentiment still holds true today. Imposing any unjust sanctions on Russia that in turn serve to weaken Russia’s economy is not in our interest. Sanctions will only further deter dialogue between Moscow and Washington, thereby pushing us further away from the diplomatic resolutions that would be in everyone’s best interests.

Instead, we must move away from antiquated Cold War thinking and look forward to a state of peace inspired by diplomacy.

Summed up brilliantly by Dr. Martin Luther King, “Wars are poor chisels for carving out peaceful tomorrows.”

He’s right. 

Call your elected officials in D.C. Tell them they should stand up to the lobbyists, stop the warmongering fear tactics, and to stand with the American people by supporting peace. 

Cliff Maloney Jr. is the president of Young Americans for Liberty (YAL). He served as National Youth Director for the Rand Paul presidential campaign.