Pavlich: Where is Brett Kavanaugh’s apology?

Last week Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughIn private moment with Trump, Justice Kennedy pushed for Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination: book GOP senator compares impeachment inquiry to Kavanaugh confirmation Christine Blasey Ford receives ACLU courage award MORE attended his investiture ceremony, further solidifying his rightful seat on the Supreme Court. President TrumpDonald John TrumpWatergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump In private moment with Trump, Justice Kennedy pushed for Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination: book Obama: 'Everybody needs to chill out' about differences between 2020 candidates MORE and Kavanaugh’s fellow justices, with the exception of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who was absent due to a fall, attended in his honor.

“This special sitting of the court is held today to receive the commission of the newly appointed associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Brett M. Kavanaugh,” Chief Justice John Roberts said at the beginning of the ceremony. “We are pleased to have with us today the president of the United States.  On behalf of the court, Mr. President, I extend to you and the first lady a warm welcome. We are also pleased to have with us our retired colleague, Justice [Anthony] Kennedy.”

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Supreme Court nominee Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandAppeals court clears way for Congress to seek Trump financial records Divisive docket to test Supreme Court ahead of 2020 Majority disapprove of Trump Supreme Court nominations, says poll MORE, who worked with Kavanaugh on the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., was also in attendance.

Just days before the ceremony took place, the Senate Judiciary Committee released a 414-page report that said not a single claim made against Kavanaugh during his confirmation hearing had any evidence.

“After an extensive investigation that included the thorough review of all potentially credible evidence submitted and interviews of more than 40 individuals with information relating to the allegations, including classmates and friends of all those involved, Committee investigators found no witness who could provide any verifiable evidence to support any of the allegations brought against Justice Kavanaugh,” the report states. “In other words, following the separate and extensive investigations by both the Committee and the FBI, there was no evidence to substantiate any of the claims of sexual assault made against Justice Kavanaugh.”

In fact, one woman admitted to congressional investigators she falsely accused Kavanaugh of rape to “get attention” and never actually met him. 

“Under questioning by Committee investigators, Ms. Munro-Leighton admitted, contrary to her prior claims, that she had not been sexually assaulted by Judge Kavanaugh,” the report reveals. “She further confessed to Committee investigators that (1) she ‘just wanted to get attention’; (2) ‘it was a tactic’; and (3) ‘that was just a ploy.’  She told Committee investigators that she had called Congress multiple times during the Kavanaugh hearing process — including prior to the time Dr. Ford’s  allegations surfaced — to  oppose  his  nomination.”

Since Kavanaugh’s confirmation was finally approved in early October, a number of individuals who made bogus claims have been referred to the Department of Justice for criminal prosecution. They are being accused of crimes ranging from conspiracy, false statements and obstruction of Congress.

“When a well-meaning citizen comes forward with information relevant to the committee’s work, I take it seriously. It takes courage to come forward, especially with allegations of sexual misconduct or personal trauma. I’m grateful for those who find that courage,” Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyTrump steps up GOP charm offensive as impeachment looms Congressional authority in a time of Trump executive overreach Overnight Health Care: Crunch time for Congress on surprise medical bills | CDC confirms 47 vaping-related deaths | Massachusetts passes flavored tobacco, vaping products ban MORE (R-Iowa) said in a statement about the referrals. “But in the heat of partisan moments, some do try to knowingly mislead the committee. That’s unfair to my colleagues, the nominees and others providing information who are seeking the truth. It stifles our ability to work on legitimate lines of inquiry. It also wastes time and resources for destructive reasons. Thankfully, the law prohibits such false statements to Congress and obstruction of congressional committee investigations. For the law to work, we can’t just brush aside potential violations. I don’t take lightly making a referral of this nature, but ignoring this behavior will just invite more of it in the future.”

Despite these facts, Democratic  Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinGOP senator blocks vote on House-passed Violence Against Women Act Congress feels heat to act on youth vaping GOP senator wants Violence Against Women Act passage by year end MORE (Calif.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBooker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations Bicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers The Hill's Morning Report - Sondland stuns; Dems pull punches in fifth debate MORE (N.J.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance On The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns Democratic strategist laments 'low bar' for Biden debate performance MORE (Calif.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseBudget process quick fixes: Fixing the wrong problem Democratic senators seek documents on Trump's alleged call for Barr press conference Senate committee advances budget reform plan MORE (R.I.) and others entered the false claims into the Congressional Record. They berated Kavanaugh in front of the country as a liar and a sexual predator.  Upon his confirmation, they vowed to impeach him should Democrats ever regain control of the Senate. Based on the false allegations perpetuated by Democratic senators and their allies in the media, the left questioned his ability to be a safe father or proper coach of his daughter’s basketball team. All of it was and continues to be a total disgrace.

Based on what we know now, it’s clearer than ever Democrats owe Kavanaugh, his family and the country an apology for the smears they proliferated. It’s just too bad one will never come.

Pavlich is the editor for Townhall.com and a Fox News contributor.