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Juan Williams: Trump, his allies and the betrayal of America

Last week Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsWill the real Lee Hamiltons and Olympia Snowes please stand up? Experts see 'unprecedented' increase in hackers targeting electric grid Intel heads to resume worldwide threats hearing scrapped under Trump MORE, the director of national intelligence, said it was “frustrating” to hear “rumors” about being fired by President TrumpDonald TrumpFranklin Graham says Trump comeback would 'be a very tough thing to do' Man suspected in wife's disappearance accused of casting her ballot for Trump Stefanik: Cheney is 'looking backwards' MORE.

They were more than rumors.

On Sunday, Trump confirmed via Twitter that Coats is leaving his position on Aug. 15.

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Officially, Coats is resigning — but no one really doubts that he has been pushed out by the president.

The president had already met with aides in late July to figure out a replacement, according to several news reports.

Coats fell out of favor with Trump for publicly confirming Russian interference in the 2016 election.

The Trump appointee also raised eyebrows at a conference when he revealed Trump failed to consult with him before extending an invitation to the White House to Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinTime for jaw-to-jaw with Moscow Hillicon Valley: Colonial pipeline is back online, but concerns remain | Uber, Lyft struggle with driver supply | Apple cuts controversial hire Menendez calls on Biden to support Armenia amid rising tensions with Azerbaijan MORE.

Now Coats is on the way out, just for doing his job. That has got to be frustrating.

But it is Coats's proposed replacement that takes this story beyond frustrating and straight to outrageous.

Trump will nominate Rep. John RatcliffeJohn Lee RatcliffeTrump alumni launch America First Policy Institute Sunday shows preview: Democrats eye two-part infrastructure push; Michigan coronavirus cases surge Former Trump officials eye bids for political office MORE (R-Texas) to fill the role. Ratcliffe is a pure political player.

He is a direct threat to the nonpartisan reputation of America’s intelligence agencies and to their ability to protect the country by producing unbiased, first-rate information.

He auditioned for the role last week, when he subjected Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE to harsh questioning when the former special counsel appeared before Congress.

Ratcliffe absurdly accused Mueller of having failed to respect "the bedrock principle of our justice system ... a presumption of innocence," when it came to Trump.

At the second of two hearings that day, Ratcliffe pumped conspiracy theories and innuendo into the congressional record, as he quizzed Mueller about the Steele dossier and the FISA warrant against former Trump aide Carter Page.

These are two red herrings that Trump allies have consistently used to try to discredit Mueller — and to downplay the threat from Russia.

Yes, that John Ratcliffe is now the nominee to be director of national intelligence.

It could have been even worse. Another name reported to have been in the mix was Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Stefanik shake-up jump-starts early jockeying for committee posts McCarthy unveils House GOP task forces, chairs MORE (R-Calif.).

This is the mudslinger who lied by saying he had evidence to support Trump’s claim that President Obama “wiretapped” Trump during the 2016 election.

Nunes’s claim to fame comes from his eagerness to promote Trump’s “deep state” and “witch hunt” narratives about the intelligence agencies. The goal is to undermine the credibility of their findings that Russia interfered in the 2016 election to help Trump win.

Ratcliffe and Nunes are enablers for Trump, allowing the White House to turn a blind eye to ongoing Russian interference.

Together, they and other allies of the president promoted baseless charges that Trump’s critics told lies that led to the U.S. counterintelligence probe into Russia’s ties to the Trump campaign.

Their goal remains distracting people from the reality that Russians repeatedly met with Trump aides and spent millions on social media to damage Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCongress won't end the wars, so states must Democrats say it's up to GOP to stop Trump 2024 Hillary Clinton to speak at Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders summit MORE.

Instead of facing that ugly truth, Ratcliffe, Nunes and Trump continue to feed conspiracy theories to right-wing websites and conservative talk radio.

Nunes came to Congress in 2003 — a time when Republicans hurled words like “treason” and “unpatriotic” at anyone who dared to criticize then-President George W. Bush’s administration over the Iraq War and its handling of the war on terror.

But after election interference in 2016, 2018 and going into 2020, we are now in a 21st century cyberwar with Russia.

Should we be calling Nunes’s patriotism into question?

“The Russians are absolutely intent on trying to interfere with our elections,” FBI Director Christopher Wray testified to Congress the day before Mueller asserted that the Russian interference is ongoing.

“It wasn’t a single attempt,” Mueller told the House Judiciary Committee last week. “They’re doing it as we sit here.”

Wray emphasized that the U.S. has — even now — not done enough to deter Russian interference.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisJournalism dies in newsroom cultures where 'fairness is overrated' Five takeaways from new CDC guidance on going maskless Disney examines mask policy, theme park capacity after updated CDC guidelines MORE, a Republican, said in May Russian hackers had breached voting systems in two counties in his state. We still don’t know which counties were affected — or what, if anything, is being done to protect those systems.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSunday shows - Cheney removal, CDC guidance reverberate Schiff: Biden administration needs to 'push harder' to stop violence in Mideast Sunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans MORE (D-Calif.) recently said he had been unaware that three Senate races had been attacked by Russia.

Earlier this year, former Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenLeft-leaning group to track which companies hire former top Trump aides Rosenstein: Zero tolerance immigration policy 'never should have been proposed or implemented' House Republican condemns anti-Trump celebrities during impeachment hearing MORE was reportedly told by White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyHeadhunters having hard time finding jobs for former Trump officials: report Trump holdovers are denying Social Security benefits to the hardest working Americans Mulvaney calls Trump's comments on Capitol riot 'manifestly false' MORE not to mention Russian interference in front of Trump for fear it would upset him by calling into question the legitimacy of his presidency.

But wait, it gets worse.

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Hours after Mueller’s impassioned plea, Senate Republicans, led by Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBipartisanship has become a partisan weapon Washington showing signs of normalcy after year of restrictions Former OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden MORE (Ky.), blocked three bills passed by the House of Representatives to safeguard U.S. elections from foreign interference.

Should we be calling into question the patriotism of every Republican who last week voted against the election security bills?

McConnell dismissed the bills as “partisan” and its authors as promoters of a “conspiracy theory.”

“This is an issue of patriotism, of national security, of protecting the very integrity of American democracy, something so many of our forbears died for. And what do we hear from the Republican side? Nothing,” said Sen. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBiden 'encouraged' by meeting with congressional leaders on infrastructure Republicans welcome the chance to work with Democrats on a bipartisan infrastructure bill Cheney sideshow distracts from important battle over Democrats' partisan voting bill MORE (N.Y.), the top Democrat in the Senate.

“To this day, Mr. Trump refuses to acknowledge the seriousness of Russian intervention, and the Republican-controlled Senate is unwilling to consider legislation for enhanced election security — maybe because doing either could be seen as an admission that the election was tainted,” the New York Times editorial board correctly pointed out.

“Conceding the obvious might seem like a small price to pay. But the president appears more concerned with nursing his ego than safeguarding American democracy — and that puts us all, Republicans, Democrats and independents, at risk.”

Let history record that a delusional president, concerned only with his own ego, and a traitorous Republican Congress, concerned only with their own reelections, chose to ignore Mueller.

Instead, Ratcliffe is the president's nominee to head national intelligence.

God save us.

Juan Williams is an author, and a political analyst for Fox News Channel.