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Pavlich: Biden wants 'infrastructure' ­– Republicans should negotiate

Pavlich: Biden wants 'infrastructure' ­– Republicans should negotiate
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It’s been two weeks since President BidenJoe BidenFauci says school should be open 'full blast' five days a week in the fall Overnight Defense: Military sexual assault reform bill has votes to pass in Senate l First active duty service member arrested over Jan. 6 riot l Israeli troops attack Gaza Strip Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart MORE introduced his so-called $2.5 trillion infrastructure plan. Most of the monstrosity isn’t for traditional infrastructure, but rather a barrage of Democrat pet projects, “human infrastructure” and far left climate proposals.

Despite his promises on the campaign trail of unity and to work in a bipartisan fashion, Biden plans to get the bill passed without Republican support. Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBiden 'encouraged' by meeting with congressional leaders on infrastructure Republicans welcome the chance to work with Democrats on a bipartisan infrastructure bill Cheney sideshow distracts from important battle over Democrats' partisan voting bill MORE (D-N.Y.) plans to get it done and announced Democrats have the ability to push through the bill without a single minority vote.

“The Parliamentarian has advised that a revised budget resolution may contain budget reconciliation instructions. This confirms the Leader’s interpretation of the Budget Act and allows Democrats additional tools to improve the lives of Americans if Republican obstruction continues. While no decisions have been made on a legislative path forward using Section 304 and some parameters still need to be worked out, the Parliamentarian’s opinion is an important step forward that this key pathway is available to Democrats if needed,” a spokesman for Schumer released in a statement.

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However, given Democratic Sens. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinJill Biden, Jennifer Garner go mask-free on vaccine-promoting West Virginia trip Manchin on infrastructure: 'We're gonna find a bipartisan pathway forward' Senate panel advances Biden's deputy Interior pick MORE (W.Va.), Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsBiden to go one-on-one with Manchin US, Iran signal possible breakthroughs in nuke talks How the United States can pass Civics 101 MORE (Del.) and others are pushing back on the price tag of the bill and what is actually being paid for, there will have to be some compromise. This gives Republicans an opportunity to advocate for real infrastructure projects that can simply be restarted while receiving some credit for getting people their jobs back.

On his first day in office, Biden signed an executive order to halt construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. Overnight, this decision eliminated thousands of well paying union jobs and drew criticism from some of his closest allies.

“The Biden Administration’s decision to cancel the Keystone XL pipeline permit on day one of his presidency is both insulting and disappointing to the thousands of hard-working LIUNA members who will lose good-paying, middle class family-supporting jobs. By blocking this 100 percent union project, and pandering to environmental extremists, a thousand union jobs will immediately vanish and 10,000 additional jobs will be foregone,” LIUNA General President Terry O’Sullivan said at the time. “Killing good union jobs on day one with nothing to replace them, is not building back better. Hopefully, the Biden Administration will not continue to allow environmental extremists to control our country’s energy agenda at the expense of union construction workers being forced to the unemployment lines.”

“I wish he hadn’t done that on the first day because the Labors International was right. It did and will cost us jobs in the process,” AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka agreed during an interview with Axios.

Biden’s current “infrastructure” plan forces unionization of a number of gig employees who don’t want to be in a union. Republicans can negotiate on this issue by asking the White House and Democrats to restore Keystone XL union jobs in return for gig workers staying independent.

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Biden also halted construction on the southern border wall within hours of his inauguration. This project is not only a badly needed tool to stem the current illegal immigration crisis, but is the definition of an infrastructure project. Not to mention, many of the contracts for the material of the wall have already been paid for but the people hired to put up the wall up are out of work. Again, union workers.

“Construction crews building the steel wall along the U.S.-Mexico border were ordered to a halt Wednesday after President Biden delivered on a campaign promise and hit ‘pause’ on the Trump administration’s signature infrastructure project,” The Washington Post reported on Jan. 20.

And finally, Republicans should ask the Biden administration to resume oil and gas production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

“I saw firsthand the pain we cause when we deny our fellow Alaskans the right to pursue opportunity. Not only do these projects have the potential to responsibly develop Alaska’s abundant natural resources — of which there is a demand that would be driven to countries with lower environmental standards — these projects bring good-paying jobs, quality healthcare, and lifechanging possibilities to communities who need it most,” Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy (R) said about the move.

In the end, Democrats have the numbers to get what they want, but Republicans should fight for traditional projects that were already underway and restore union jobs Biden eliminated with the stroke of a pen.

Pavlich is the editor for Townhall.com and a Fox News contributor.