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Trump’s first year in office was the year of the woman

Trump’s first year in office was the year of the woman
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It is a feat so great that President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaInaugural poet Amanda Gorman inks deal with IMG Models Biden knows healing the US means addressing pandemic and economy first Can the media regain credibility under Biden? MORE was unable to accomplish it.

President George W. Bush did better than his republican predecessors, but still fell a bit short.

Even President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBiden knows healing the US means addressing pandemic and economy first Can the media regain credibility under Biden? McConnell proposes postponing impeachment trial until February MORE came under fire from women’s organizations for his shortcomings on delivering a cabinet that “looks like America.”

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The unattainable feat?

Hiring an astounding number of women for senior-level positions in the White House.

Luckily for women everywhere, in 2018 it has finally been accomplished.

Naturally, Vogue has written about it. Cosmopolitan has shouted it from the rooftops, as has MSNBC and every other liberal news outlet.

If only that last part were true.

Despite impressive hiring practices during his first year in the White House, President Donald TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE has received little to no credit for his choice of women for the most senior positions on his cabinet, as well as the West Wing.

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In fact, the mainstream media only selectively reported on the male appointees of the Trump administration, claiming that he was appointing “more white and male than any first cabinet since Reagan.” This myth was perpetuated by Rep. Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOklahoma man who videotaped himself with his feet on desk in Pelosi's office during Capitol riot released on bond House formally sends impeachment to Senate, putting Trump on trial for Capitol riot With another caravan heading North, a closer look at our asylum law MORE’s (D-Calif.) comments as well as media reports that Trump only valued the opinions of “guys named Steve.”

The New York Times even reported on Jan. 13, 2017 — a full week before Trump even took the oath of office or set foot in the oval office — that he apparently preferred men over women for senior roles.

 

The organization never published a follow-up story in the same way touting the roles that women impressively took on within the administration. Instead, they chose to focus on the inane differences of “inner-cabinet” members (those in line of succession to the presidency) versus other cabinet members, rather than looking at the wide-sweeping empowerment and hiring of women across the entire White House operation.

One of the greatest successes of Trump’s first year in office has been the empowerment of women. Certainly, there have been plenty of other successes in the first year of the Trump administration — a record stock market surpassing 25,000, unemployment at a 17-year low, illegal border crossings lowered by 76 percent, a unanimous United Nations resolution against a nuclear North Korea, and more than 1 million bonuses given to American workers in just the last three weeks thanks to Trump’s leadership on tax reform. However, to write about those accomplishments without mentioning the women who helped make it happen is to miss part of the story.

So, why have the mainstream media given him no credit? Why haven’t the glossy magazines – who pride themselves on empowering women in the workplace — given him credit where credit is due? If Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSenate to vote Tuesday on Biden's secretary of State pick Portman planned exit sets off Ohio free-for-all Biden must wait weekend for State Department pick MORE were president, they would be touting her accomplishments.

The answer is because Trump is a republican. It’s accurate to state that he is just not their guy.

How can one prove this?

Only seven percent of journalists recently identified as republican during the last presidential election cycle; that’s right, ninety-three percent of journalists said they were not republican in 2015. Compare this number to 1992 when the New York Times reported that just 44 percent of journalists claimed to be democrats.

The Center for Public Integrity also revealed through its analysis of the 2016 elections that journalists “overwhelmingly donated” to Hillary Clinton. So much for independently refereeing the match.

However, just because Trump doesn’t receive credit for his hiring of women doesn’t mean it’s any less significant.

His list of female appointees is long: Nikki HaleyNikki HaleyNikki Haley: If Biden rejoins Human Rights Council 'it will fly in the face of our fight for human rights' Trump selects South Carolina lawyer for impeachment trial Can we protect our country — from our rulers, and ourselves? MORE, Ambassador to the United Nations (not only a woman but also child of Indian American Sikh immigrants); Elaine ChaoElaine ChaoSchumer becomes new Senate majority leader FDA chief says he was 'disgusted' by Capitol riots, considered resigning McMaster: Trump running again would be 'terribly divisive' MORE, Secretary of Transportation; Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenRosenstein: Zero tolerance immigration policy 'never should have been proposed or implemented' House Republican condemns anti-Trump celebrities during impeachment hearing Acting DHS chief Chad Wolf stepping down MORE, Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security; Dr. Heather Wilson, Secretary of the Air Force; Sarah Sanders, White House Press Secretary; Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayGeorge Conway: Trump's 'influence will wane as he fades into history as a pariah' Pence's relationship with Trump fractures in final days Kellyanne Conway condemns violence, supports Trump in statement on Capitol riots MORE, Counselor to the President; Linda McMahonLinda Marie McMahonApril's dumbest and most dangerous coronavirus declarations Trump convenes sports commissioners in hopes of filling stadiums Senate confirms Trump pick for small business chief MORE, Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration; Betsy DeVosBetsy DeVosPardon talk intensifies as Trump approaches final 24 hours in office Azar in exit letter to Trump says Capitol riot could 'tarnish' legacy READ: Departure letter from HHS Secretary Azar to Trump MORE, Secretary of Education; Jovita Carranza, U.S. Treasurer (also a minority and first-generation Mexican American immigrant); Neomi Rao, Regulation Czar (also a minority and daughter of parents from India); Seema Verma, Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (also a minority); Heather Brand, Associate Attorney General; Kelly Sadler, Director of Surrogate & Coalitions Outreach; Mercedes Schlapp, Senior Communications Advisor (also a minority whose father was once a political prisoner of Fidel Castro); Ivanka TrumpIvanka TrumpRubio: Trump impeachment trial is 'stupid' The Hill's Morning Report - Biden's crisis agenda hits headwinds NRSC chair says he'll back GOP incumbents against Trump primary challengers MORE, Advisor to the President; Hope HicksHope HicksTrump selects Hicks, Bondi, Grenell and other allies for positions Trump lawyer Jenna Ellis tests positive for coronavirus Women set to take key roles in Biden administration MORE, Communications Director; Jessica Ditto, Deputy Director of Communications; and Dina Powell, Deputy National Security Adviser who according to White House sources will remain in her position through the end of January and will likely be replaced by another woman after Powell completes her first year in office.

In addition to the career professionals in the White House, there is the somewhat reluctant First Lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpScorned and mistreated, Melania Trump deserved much better from the media The Hill's Morning Report - Biden takes office, calls for end to 'uncivil war' K Street navigates virtual inauguration week MORE, who arguably has stepped up to the plate bigtime in times of crisis such as Hurricane Harvey (in five-inch stiletto heels, no less.)

With their first year in office under their belts, most of the women listed above will convene tomorrow for a “Conversation with the Women of America” to discuss economics, health care, national security and how in their respective roles they intend to continue helping “Make America Great Again” during the second year of the Trump administration.

If liberals today had any shred of intellectual honesty left among them, they would admit that Trump’s placement of women in senior level positions is impressive and establishes a precedent that helps their own daughters and granddaughters.

Unfortunately, the left will never admit it.

Regardless of what one thinks of Trump the man, there is no denying the numbers of women he has placed in power in the West Wing. As we commemorate the one-year anniversary of his inauguration this week, I predict that history will eventually reveal the complete story – that Trump’s actions are not only a small step for a male republican president but a giant leap for all of womankind, regardless of political party.

Jen Kerns has served as a GOP strategist and writer for the U.S. presidential debates for FOX News. She previously served as communications director and spokeswoman for the California Republican Party, the Colorado Recalls over gun control, and the Prop. 8 battle over marriage which went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.