Juan Williams: Don't rule out impeaching Trump

Juan Williams: Don't rule out impeaching Trump
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Impeach him?

That is the question for the Democratic majority in the House.

Last week, Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPhotos of the Week: Schumer, ASU protest and sea turtles Hospitals in underserved communities face huge cuts in reckless 'Build Back Better' plan GOP infighting takes stupid to a whole new level MORE (D-Calif.) said she is against impeachment unless Democrats and Republicans come together and call for it. She is rejecting what the GOP did to President Clinton — impeachment with no plausible path to a Senate vote to remove him from office.

This means the key is Republican opinion.

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Democrats are ready to go. 

Sixty-six percent of Democrats told a Quinnipiac University poll released this month that Congress “should begin the process to impeach President TrumpDonald TrumpHillicon Valley — State Dept. employees targets of spyware Ohio Republican Party meeting ends abruptly over anti-DeWine protesters Jan. 6 panel faces new test as first witness pleads the Fifth MORE.”

But among Republicans, only 6 percent said it is time for impeachment.

In fact, just 21 percent of Republicans believe special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerAn unquestioning press promotes Rep. Adam Schiff's book based on Russia fiction Senate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG MORE’s investigation into possible conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia is legitimate, according to a December Quinnipiac poll.

That fits with an NPR/Marist poll, also from December, that found 71 percent of Republicans stand by the president’s claim that he is the victim of a “witch hunt.” 

Now for a dose of reality.

That same poll found “a majority of independents and 4 in 5 Democrats see Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation as ‘fair.’”

That means all that stands between Trump and impeachment hearings is a thin but unbending reed of support from the declining number of Americans who identify as Republicans. 

More than a few formerly loyal Republicans have departed as the GOP has become the Party of Trump.

The result is that Trump can point to support among the remaining Republicans as sky high, near 90 percent, and claim to be the most popular Republican in history.

This political distortion remains a stubborn reality even as Gallup’s most recent poll has Trump’s approval rating among all Americans dropping to only 39 percent.

Megan Brenan of Gallup wrote that “approval of Trump remains sharply polarized — 90 percent of Republicans, 33 percent of independents and 4 percent of Democrats currently approve.”

Even in the face of guilty pleas, convictions and evidence of repeated contacts between Russians and Trump campaign officials, the Trump media and his political supporters reflexively revert to giving blind support to the president.

Somehow they don’t see that Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortCountering the ongoing Republican delusion Yellen should utilize the resources available before pushing new regulations Huawei paid Tony Podesta 0K for White House lobbying MORE, and his former personal lawyer, Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenMichael Cohen to sell prison badge as NFT Sunday shows - Spotlight shifts to omicron variant Cohen says Weisselberg not 'key' to Trump case MORE, are on their way to jail.

They dismiss the reality that Cohen now describes Trump as a “racist,” a “con man,” and a “cheat.”

After that testimony, polls found more Americans believe Cohen than believe Trump.

But once again, Trump’s faithful stayed behind the president.

To get a clear picture of the current grip Trump has on what remains of the GOP, take another look at the Quinnipiac poll this month. Eighty-nine percent of Democrats said Trump “committed crimes before he became president.” 

But 48 percent of Republicans say that is not true. 

This is not just a political difference of opinion between Republicans and Democrats.

“Every other listed party, gender, education, age and racial group says by wide margins that Trump committed crimes,” Quinnipiac reported.

To tune into Trump’s defenders — online, on radio and on television — is to hear the president portrayed as a man hunted by a mob of Democrats, elites, ‘Deep State’ actors in the FBI and CIA, and even Republicans from Mueller to former FBI director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyCountering the ongoing Republican delusion How Biden should sell his infrastructure bill 'Finally, infrastructure week!': White House celebrates T bill MORE and former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsPress: For Trump endorsement: The more sordid, the better Those predicting Facebook's demise are blowing smoke If bitcoin is 'digital gold,' it should be taxed like gold MORE

Last week, however, some light made its way through Trump’s iron curtain.

He lost a slice of Republican support in the House and Senate as both chambers voted to disapprove of his declaration of a national emergency after Congress turned down his request for money to build a border wall.

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This was a rare rebuke of the president by the Republican-controlled Senate. And it wasn’t just moderates like Maine’s Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPhotos of the Week: Schumer, ASU protest and sea turtles Real relief from high gas prices The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden to announce increased measures for omicron MORE and Alaska’s Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiCongress should reject H.R. 1619's dangerous anywhere, any place casino precedent Democratic frustration growing over stagnating voting rights bills Graham emerges as go-to ally for Biden's judicial picks MORE. Conservatives who are normally allies of the president, such as Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense & National Security — US tries to deter Russian invasion of Ukraine Senate eyes plan B amid defense bill standoff To counter China, the Senate must confirm US ambassadors MORE (Fla.), Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerHillicon Valley — Chinese disinformation accounts removed GOP resistance to Biden FCC nominee could endanger board's Democratic majority Bottom line MORE (Miss.) and Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.), also broke with him.

Once again, the Trump echo chamber got busy attacking Republicans who voted their conscience, deriding them as weaklings.

So Pelosi has a point when she predicts that impeaching Trump would be “divisive to the country.”

Respectfully, Speaker Pelosi, the Constitution says Congress has a duty to impeach the president if it finds that he has committed “high crimes and misdemeanors.” There is no exception stating “unless it divides the country.”

And Pelosi can’t stop the approaching 2020 primaries.

Aided by the subpoena power of House Democrats, new information about the president’s business dealings, both foreign and domestic, is likely to raise eyebrows during the campaign, even among Trump’s myopic loyalists. 

In addition, the GOP will also be defending 22 Senate seats to keep their majority in 2020. Do those 22 senators really want their careers to come down to a referendum on Trump? 

Impeachment might not seem so divisive a short time from now.

Juan Williams is an author, and a political analyst for Fox News Channel.