Juan Williams: The high price of working for Trump

As we approach Easter allow me to ask Republicans in Congress and the cabinet a question that comes from the gospel lessons.

“What will it profit a man if he gains the whole world and suffers the loss of his soul?” (Matthew 16:26)

Let’s check in on Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenOvernight Energy: Mueller report reveals Russian efforts to sow division over coal jobs | NYC passes sweeping climate bill likened to 'Green New Deal' | EPA official says agency may ban asbestos | Energy Dept. denies Perry planning exit The Hill's 12:30 Report: Inside the Mueller report Energy Dept denies report that Rick Perry is planning to leave Trump admin MORE as our most recent example of a suffering soul in the aftermath of working with President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls Sri Lankan prime minister following church bombings Ex-Trump lawyer: Mueller knew Trump had to call investigation a 'witch hunt' for 'political reasons' The biggest challenge from the Mueller Report depends on the vigilance of everyone MORE.

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Nielsen, a career bureaucrat, rose to prominence when she accepted Trump’s offer to become Secretary of Homeland Security.

Last week Trump fired her even though she tortured the nation’s conscience as she tried to implement his cruel, zero-tolerance immigration policies.

That included separating immigrant children from their parents. Many of those children have yet to be reunited with their parents.

But it wasn’t enough. Trump wanted her to break the law and begin turning away people with legal asylum claims, according to several reports.

When she refused to break the law, Trump made her the scapegoat for his failed policies.

More families and children are now trying to cross the border in reaction to Trump’s constant threats, including his call to close the border. To repeat, Trump has made the situation worse.

Given this failure let me ask you:

Was Nielsen the person who told Americans that Mexico was going to pay for a wall on the border?

Did she send troops to the border after falsely saying that there was an “invasion” of terrorists, gang members and diseased people?

Did she shut down the government in a failed attempt to get the Congress to pay for the wall?

Of course, those futile gestures all belong to Trump.

But it is Nielsen who exited the public stage in disgrace.

Jeffrey Toobin of CNN summed up Nielsen’s soul-crushing experience as “a great example of what happens when you go to work for Donald Trump.”

“He is the great reputation killer. Here is this woman who was a reasonably admired bureaucrat. For the rest of her life people will look at her and think, 'Oh, that's the woman who put children in cages,'” explained Toobin.

Many former Trump officials have sacrificed their once-honorable reputation.

It is hard to recall but former Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonJuan Williams: The high price of working for Trump Graham jokes to Pompeo: You're the 'longest-serving member of the cabinet, right?' Trump moves to install loyalists MORE was a celebrated business leader as the CEO of Exxon Mobil before he joined Trump’s cabinet. He left Washington humiliated, insulted and unceremoniously fired.

Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsAnd the winner of the Robert Mueller Sweepstakes is — Vladimir Putin The Memo: Mueller's depictions will fuel Trump angst Collins: Mueller report includes 'an unflattering portrayal' of Trump MORE, a leading Republican, was the first U.S. senator to endorse Trump for president. He was mocked and nearly in tears when he was forced out as attorney general.

Former White House chiefs of staff Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusTrump snapped at McMaster for taking notes during meeting: report The Memo: Mueller's depictions will fuel Trump angst Trump: Some statements about him in Mueller report are 'total bulls---' MORE and John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE had eminent careers in politics and the military before signing on with the Trump train. They too got run out by Trump.

Pressure to make excuses for Trump is now a daily burden on nearly every Republican in Congress.

The most shameful exhibition has been Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHillicon Valley: House Dems subpoena full Mueller report | DOJ pushes back at 'premature' subpoena | Dems reject offer to view report with fewer redactions | Trump camp runs Facebook ads about Mueller report | Uber gets B for self-driving cars DOJ: Dem subpoena for Mueller report is 'premature and unnecessary' Dems reject Barr's offer to view Mueller report with fewer redactions MORE (R-S.C.), who refused to criticize the president even when Trump mocked his dead friend — the late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCain10 factors making Russia election interference the most enduring scandal of the Obama era Earth Day founder's daughter: Most Republican leaders believe in climate change in private Trump gives nod to vulnerable GOP Sen. McSally with bill signing MORE (R-Ariz.).

Graham limited himself to tweeting that McCain’s service to the nation as a military hero and political leader will never be “changed or diminished.”

Why did Sen. Graham say nothing more about Trump’s false attacks on a dead man?

“President Trump has been good to me in the sense that he’s allowed me in his world,” Graham told CNN last month. “He’s made decisions, I think, based on some input I’ve given him.”

Excuse me, senator, did you really say that Trump gets a pass because he “allowed you in his world?”

You are the senior senator from South Carolina.

“I am waiting for Republican members of the Senate who served with [McCain] for years and allowed him to be the point of the spear on so many issues [to stand up for him],” said John Weaver, formerly a top adviser to McCain.

A cynic might look at Graham as just another Republican in Congress worried about a primary challenge from a pro-Trump candidate this cycle.

So, is this all about retaining power while losing your soul, senator?

Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenTrump, businesses sue Oversight chairman to block subpoena for financial records The Hill's Morning Report - Is impeachment back on the table? Dems digging into Trump finances post-Mueller MORE, who worked as Trump’s personal attorney, told Congress earlier this year that “I’ve lost it all,” as a result of covering for Trump.

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"I did the same thing that you're doing now for 10 years. I protected Mr. Trump for 10 years," Cohen warned congressional Republicans at a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing in February.

“I can only warn people, the more people that follow Mr. Trump as I did blindly are going to suffer the same consequences that I’m suffering," Cohen added.

Several people close to Trump are suffering the same consequences as Mr. Cohen – there will be jail time for Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortIt is wrong to say 'no collusion' The Hill's Morning Report - Is impeachment back on the table? Nadler: I don't understand why Mueller didn't charge Donald Trump Jr., others in Trump Tower meeting MORE, Rick Gates, and Michael Flynn. After his trial, Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneThe Hill's Morning Report - Is impeachment back on the table? End of Mueller shifts focus to existing probes Heavily redacted Mueller report leaves major questions unanswered MORE may face jail too. But others, like Kirstjen Nielsen, are suffering a different type of consequence: public shaming and the loss of their reputations.

The question is when will Republicans, having already lost control of their party to Trump, realize that in the words of the gospel they will inevitably lose their personal reputations and risk their souls too before the end of the Trump show.

Juan Williams is an author, and a political analyst for Fox News Channel.