Intel chairs slam 'knee-jerk' opposition to cyber sharing bill

Intel chairs slam 'knee-jerk' opposition to cyber sharing bill
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Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrHillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns Bipartisan representatives demand answers on expired surveillance programs Rep. Mark Walker says he's been contacted about Liberty University vacancy MORE (R-N.C.) and ranking member Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTrump plans to pick Amy Coney Barrett to replace Ginsburg on court Trump faces tricky choice on Supreme Court pick The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump previews SCOTUS nominee as 'totally brilliant' MORE (D-Calif.) are taking on critics of a cybersecurity information-sharing bill.

The sponsors of the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) hit back at opponents who have likened the measure to a "surveillance bill" on Friday.

“[T]here are some groups that are opposing the bill out of a knee-jerk reaction against any communication between the government and industry,” Feinstein and Burr said in a statement.

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“If these special interest groups are successful in mischaracterizing this bill, which authorizes purely voluntary sharing, they will only succeed in allowing more personal information to be compromised to criminals and foreign countries.”

The Intelligence panel leaders urged action on the bill following a breach that might have exposed private data for 15 million current and prospective T-Mobile customers.

The bill is intended to boost the flow of information between the federal government and private industry.

CISA has faced fierce opposition from privacy groups and the technology industry on the grounds that it will funnel personal data to government agencies that have shown they are incapable of protecting sensitive information.

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns On The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline Democratic senators ask inspector general to investigate IRS use of location tracking service MORE (D-Ore.) was the only senator to vote against CISA in committee and has led the charge against the bill.

“The United States should pull out all the stops to go after foreign hackers and foreign threats, but there’s a way to do that without threatening the privacy of millions of law-abiding Americans,” Wyden said in June.

The legislation could see floor time as early as next week. Observers say that leadership is working on a deal to cut down on a list of 21 amendments currently slated for debate.

On Thursday, T-Mobile revealed that a security breach at one of its vendors might have exposed the personal data of people who had a credit check with the company over a two-year period ending Sept. 16.