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Cyber bill could let feds spy on library users, advocate warns

Cyber bill could let feds spy on library users, advocate warns
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Librarians are warning that a cybersecurity bill about to hit the Senate floor could help the government spy on people using library computers. 

On Wednesday, the head of the country’s largest advocate for libraries urged senators to oppose the “privacy-hostile” bill known as the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA).

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The measure is meant to boost the exchange of data about hackers between companies and the government.

"When librarians oppose a bill with ‘information sharing’ in its name you can be sure that the bill is decidedly more than advertised,” said Sari Feldman, president of the American Library Association (ALA).

CISA-related lobbying has ramped up in recent weeks as the measure inches closer to the Senate floor. It could come up as early as next week.

While most industry groups, a large bipartisan coalition of lawmakers and even the White House support the bill as a way to better understand and thwart hackers, privacy advocates have argued the measure would simply funnel more of people's private data to the government.

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenGOP senator: Raising corporate taxes is a 'non-starter' Democrats get good news from IRS IRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting trillion MORE (D-Ore.) has been leading a small but growing group of privacy-minded senators who have spoken out against the bill.

Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring Anti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle Fauci on Tucker Carlson vaccine comments: 'Typical crazy conspiracy theory' MORE (R-Ky.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersSirota: Biden has not fulfilled campaign promise of combating union-busting tactics Democratic senators call on Biden to support waiving vaccine patents Progressives put Democrats on defense MORE (I-Vt.), both presidential candidates, have joined Wyden's opposition. They point to what they say are inadequate provisions requiring companies and the government to strip out sensitive data prior to sharing it with intelligence agencies.

“As Sens. Wyden, Paul and Sanders have courageously pointed out in opposition to it, the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act would dramatically over-share the personal information of tens of millions of Americans who depend upon library computer networks, and could function, as a practical matter, as a new warrantless surveillance tool,” Feldman said.

The ALA in April joined a large coalition of civil liberties groups, security specialists and academics in a letter to senators expressing similar concerns about CISA.

CISA’s proponents, including co-sponsors Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrA proposal to tackle congressional inside trading: Invest in the US Former Gov. Pat McCrory enters GOP Senate race in North Carolina Lara Trump leads GOP field in North Carolina Senate race, poll shows MORE (R-N.C.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinOvernight Defense: Army moves to combat sexual crimes | Eight West Point cadets expelled | Democratic senators want to restrict F-35 sale to UAE A proposal to tackle congressional inside trading: Invest in the US Democratic senators seek to constrain F-35 sale to UAE MORE (D-Calif.), have said these allegations are inaccurate.

The two lawmakers, who head the Senate Intelligence Committee, say they have worked with privacy groups to tighten requirements to remove personal information.

“They’re not for any bill,” Burr said at a recent event, noting that CISA’s language expressly forbids the bill from authorizing any new surveillance authority.

“Some people you just can’t satisfy no matter what you do,” Feinstein added, speaking at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.