McConnell: Cyber bill 'could help prevent future attacks'

McConnell: Cyber bill 'could help prevent future attacks'
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief agreement | Weekly jobless claims fall below 1 million for first time since March | Trump says no Post Office funding means Democrats 'can't have universal mail-in voting' Overnight Health Care: Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief deal | US records deadliest day of summer | Georgia governor drops lawsuit over Atlanta's mask mandate Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief deal MORE (R-Ky.) kicked off Wednesday’s session with a call to swiftly move a long-stalled cybersecurity bill.

The Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) would encourage companies to share more data on hackers with the government.

ADVERTISEMENT

The bill would “help protect Americans’ most private and personal information,” McConnell said. “It would do so by defeating cyberattacks through the sharing of information.

“It contains modern tools that cybersecurity experts tell us could help prevent future attacks against both the public and private sectors,” he added.

CISA has spurred a contentious debate over its privacy protections and potential effectiveness.

While lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have joined with numerous industry groups to support the bill as a necessary step to better understanding and thwarting hackers, digital rights groups and a growing number of prominent tech companies have pushed back, arguing the bill would merely shuttle Americans’ personal data to the government without actually bolstering cyber defenses.

McConnell and the bill’s backers have pointed to clauses they claim require companies to only share relevant cyber threat data and to remove all personal information prior to sharing anything with the government.

CISA “contains important measures to protect individual privacy and civil liberties,” McConnell said. “And it’s been carefully scrutinized by Senators of both parties. In short, this legislation is strong, transparent and bipartisan.”

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenElection security advocates see strong ally in Harris OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Watchdog report raises new questions for top Interior lawyer | Senate Democrats ask Trump to withdraw controversial public lands nominee | Border wall water use threatens endangered species, environmentalists say Watchdog report raises new questions for top Interior lawyer MORE (D-Ore.) is leading a coalition of privacy-minded senators in a fight to heavily edit the bill. He and several others are guaranteed votes on a series of amendments that would heighten the requirements to remove personal identification. But the edits all face uphill battles and would need 60 votes to pass.

McConnell filed cloture on CISA Tuesday night, setting up a likely procedural vote for Thursday and potentially a final vote for early next week.

“Every Senator should want to protect Americans’ most private and personal information, which means every Senator should want to see this bill pass,” he said. “With cooperation, we will.”