Clinton endorses Warner-McCaul encryption commission

Clinton endorses Warner-McCaul encryption commission
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Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRonan Farrow exposes how the media protect the powerful Kamala Harris to Trump Jr.: 'You wouldn't know a joke if one raised you' Comey says he has a 'fantasy' about deleting his Twitter account after end of Trump term MORE is endorsing a compromise measure on encryption from Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenators take fundraising efforts to Nats playoff games Senate Intelligence report triggers new calls for action on election security Senate Intel report urges action to prevent Russian meddling in 2020 election MORE (D-Va.) and House Homeland Security Chairman Michael McCaul (R-Texas).

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The support came as part of a broad tech policy position released by the Clinton campaign Tuesday.

“Hillary rejects the false choice between privacy interests and keeping Americans safe,” her campaign said.

Warner and McCaul’s offering would establish a national commission to study the contentious problem of how law enforcement can gain access to locked communications during investigations without hampering the privacy and security of lawful tech users.

“This commission will work with the technology and public safety communities to address the needs of law enforcement, protect the privacy and security of all Americans that use technology, assess how innovation might point to new policy approaches, and advance our larger national security and global competitiveness interests,” the Clinton campaign said.

Clinton went slightly further than the Obama administration, which is thought to have a favorable view of the legislation but has not formally endorsed it.

The position puts her at odds with presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpGiuliani says he is unaware of reported federal investigation Louisiana's Democratic governor forced into runoff Lawmakers focus their ire on NBA, not China MORE, who has suggested that users should boycott Apple — famous for refusing to help investigators unlock the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino, Calif., shooters, citing security and privacy concerns. 

Warner and McCaul are competing with a cornucopia of proposals tackling encryption, including a nonlegislative working group established by the House Judiciary and Energy and Commerce committees, which both claim jurisdiction over the issue.

A separate proposal, from Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrBlood cancer patients deserve equal access to the cure Senate Intelligence report triggers new calls for action on election security Senate Intel report urges action to prevent Russian meddling in 2020 election MORE (R-N.C.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSchiff should consider using RICO framework to organize impeachment We need answers to questions mainstream media won't ask about Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Trump grapples with Syria fallout MORE (D-Calif.), would require companies to provide “technical assistance” to investigators seeking access to locked data.