Mueller team adds prosecutor specializing in cyber crime

Ryan Dickey, a veteran cyber crime prosecutor, has joined special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's team of investigators. 

A spokesman for the special counsel's office confirmed to The Hill on Wednesday that Dickey was assigned to Mueller's investigation in early November from the Justice Department's Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section. 

The Washington Post first reported that Dickey had joined Mueller's team. 

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Dickey is the first known veteran prosecutor of cyber crimes to join the special counsel investigation, which is examining Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

Mueller took over the law enforcement investigation in May, after President TrumpDonald John TrumpWhite House sued over lack of sign language interpreters at coronavirus briefings Wife blames Trump, lack of masks for husband's coronavirus death in obit: 'May Karma find you all' Trump authorizes reduced funding for National Guard coronavirus response through 2020 MORE fired FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyThis week: Negotiators hunt for coronavirus deal as August break looms FBI officials hid copies of Russia probe documents fearing Trump interference: book Sally Yates to testify as part of GOP probe into Russia investigation MORE. His team mostly consists of white-collar crime prosecutors and investigators.

Computer crimes, however, play a prominent role in Mueller's investigation, particularly because of cyber breaches that led to the release of a number of Democrats' emails during the 2016 campaign. 

The special counsel's probe has so far led to the indictments of former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortTrump says he would consider pardons for those implicated in Mueller investigation Graham releases newly declassified documents on Russia probe The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - Mask mandates, restrictions issued as COVID-19 spreads MORE and his associate Richard Gates, who are facing charges of tax evasion, money laundering and failing to register as foreign agents, among other allegations.

The investigation has also led to guilty pleas from two former Trump campaign advisers, George PapadopoulosGeorge Demetrios PapadopoulosTrump says he would consider pardons for those implicated in Mueller investigation New FBI document confirms the Trump campaign was investigated without justification Republicans plow ahead with Russia origins probe MORE and Michael Flynn, who also served as the president's first national security adviser. Both admitted to lying to the FBI about their contacts with Russian representatives. 

Trump has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing or coordination with the Russians, and has called Mueller's investigation a "witch hunt" that has cast a shadow over his tenure in the White House.