Republican lawmaker introduces new cyber deterrence bill

Republican lawmaker introduces new cyber deterrence bill

Rep. Ted YohoTheodore (Ted) Scott YohoOn The Money: Trump announces new China tariffs | Wall Street salaries hit highest level since 2008 | GOP bets the House on the economy GOP: The economy will shield us from blue wave House passes measure to identify, sanction hackers assisting in cyberattacks against US MORE (R-Fla.) on Wednesday rolled out a new cyber deterrence bill that aims to establish a process for the federal government to identify, deter and respond to state-sponsored cyberattacks against the United States.

The bipartisan legislation, the Cyber Deterrence and Response Act of 2018, lays out a three-step process that would require the sitting president to identify who the aggressors are and designate them as “critical cyber threats,” and then impose sanctions in response to the malicious cyber activity.

The president can decide to issue additional sanctions against foreign nations that he has determined have had any degree of involvement in the hostile cyberattack, or decide to waive the sanctions on a case-by-case basis for up to a year.

The legislation also says the president may issue both travel- and nontravel-related sanctions.

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The purpose of the bill would be to "name and shame" the entities carrying out such attacks against the U.S. 

“With a keystroke, countries can disrupt our networks, endanger our critical infrastructure, harm our economy, and undermine our elections," Yoho said in a statement.

"State-sponsored cyberattacks are increasing exponentially from China, North Korea, Iran, and Russia and it is vital that we take the necessary steps to thwart these potentially devastating attacks," he added.

House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed RoyceEdward (Ed) Randall RoyceOvernight Defense: Latest on Korea talks | Trump says summit results 'very exciting!' | Congress to get Space Force plan in February | Trump asked CIA about silent bombs Poll: House GOP candidate leads in California swing district Overnight Defense: Congress reaches deal preventing shutdown | Pentagon poised to be funded on time for first time in years | House GOP rejects effort to get Putin summit documents MORE (R-Calif.) and ranking member Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelState Department: Allegations of racism 'disgusting and false' The stakes are sky-high for the pro-life cause in the upcoming midterms Overnight Defense: Trump tells veterans he will 'stand up for America' | McConnell, Ryan say Putin not welcome on Capitol Hill | Mattis tries to explain Trump's Iran tweet MORE (D-N.Y.), as well as Reps. Steve ChabotSteven (Steve) Joseph ChabotDems seek to rebuild blue wall in Rust Belt contests Support the Trademark Licensing Protection Act Congress losing faith in Nobel Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi MORE (R-Ohio), Ted PoeLloyd (Ted) Theodore PoeCook shifts two House GOP seats closer to Dem column Five races to watch in the Texas runoffs Five Republican run-offs to watch in Texas MORE (R-Texas), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickSinema, Fitzpatrick call for long-term extension of Violence Against Women Act Dems seek to rebuild blue wall in Rust Belt contests Congress prepares to punt biggest political battles until after midterms MORE (R-Penn.), Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsRepublicans threaten to subpoena Nellie Ohr Conservatives left frustrated as Congress passes big spending bills Graham to renew call for second special counsel MORE (R-N.C.), Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanLawmakers press Trump officials on implementing Russia sanctions Swastika painted on sidewalk in Colorado town: report Top Dem lawmaker pushing committee for closed-door debrief with Trump’s interpreter MORE (D-Calif.), Jim LangevinJames (Jim) R. LangevinThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Facing major hurricane, Trump is tested House panel approves bill to codify key cybersecurity program at DHS Hillicon Valley: New fears over Chinese espionage | T-Mobile, Sprint execs to testify on B merger | Cyber firm denies hacking back on China | Salesforce workers criticize border patrol contract MORE (D-R.I.), and Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroCook Political Report moves Texas Senate race to ‘toss-up’ Julián and Joaquin Castro to campaign with O'Rourke in Texas Castro says Dems will restart Russia probe if they win back the House MORE (D-Texas) all signed on to support the bill.

One congressional aide told The Hill on Wednesday the legislation aims to codify the executive orders former President Obama issued in in 2015, as well as a revised version of the order made in 2016.

Obama issued the latest executive order in December 2016 in response to Russian interference during the presidential election.

The 2015 order, which applied to a broad range of activities a threat actor could carry out against the U.S., was not limited to a specific country.

It stated that the “increasing prevalence and severity of malicious cyber-enabled activities” serve as “an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States.”

Special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE has charged 13 Russian individuals and three Russian groups with carrying out “information warfare” on social media platforms and by other sophisticated means to sow discord across all 50 states.

Trump followed suit in March, handing down sanctions against a handful of Russians for their cyber activity under the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act as well as Obama’s 2015 executive order.