Republican lawmaker introduces new cyber deterrence bill

Republican lawmaker introduces new cyber deterrence bill

Rep. Ted YohoTheodore (Ted) Scott YohoCNN slams GOP for not appearing on network after mass shootings, conservatives fire back Conservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran MORE (R-Fla.) on Wednesday rolled out a new cyber deterrence bill that aims to establish a process for the federal government to identify, deter and respond to state-sponsored cyberattacks against the United States.

The bipartisan legislation, the Cyber Deterrence and Response Act of 2018, lays out a three-step process that would require the sitting president to identify who the aggressors are and designate them as “critical cyber threats,” and then impose sanctions in response to the malicious cyber activity.

The president can decide to issue additional sanctions against foreign nations that he has determined have had any degree of involvement in the hostile cyberattack, or decide to waive the sanctions on a case-by-case basis for up to a year.

The legislation also says the president may issue both travel- and nontravel-related sanctions.

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The purpose of the bill would be to "name and shame" the entities carrying out such attacks against the U.S. 

“With a keystroke, countries can disrupt our networks, endanger our critical infrastructure, harm our economy, and undermine our elections," Yoho said in a statement.

"State-sponsored cyberattacks are increasing exponentially from China, North Korea, Iran, and Russia and it is vital that we take the necessary steps to thwart these potentially devastating attacks," he added.

House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed RoyceEdward (Ed) Randall RoyceMystery surrounds elusive sanctions on Russia Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp House panel advances bill to protect elections from foreign interference MORE (R-Calif.) and ranking member Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelDemocrats slam alleged politicization of Trump State Department after IG report Trump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China Liberal Democrat eyes aid cuts to Israel after Omar, Tlaib denied entry MORE (D-N.Y.), as well as Reps. Steve ChabotSteven (Steve) Joseph ChabotRepublican congressman hopes Trump crowd will avoid 'send her back' chants at Ohio rally Mueller declines to answer dozens of questions from lawmakers House passes annual intelligence bill MORE (R-Ohio), Ted PoeLloyd (Ted) Theodore PoeSenate Dem to reintroduce bill with new name after 'My Little Pony' confusion Texas New Members 2019 Cook shifts two House GOP seats closer to Dem column MORE (R-Texas), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickHouse Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 Ensuring quality health care for those with intellectual disabilities and autism House Democrats target 2020 GOP incumbents in new ad MORE (R-Penn.), Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsTrump finds consistent foil in 'Squad' Gun store billboard going after the 'Squad' being removed following backlash Hurd retirement leaves GOP gloomy on 2020 MORE (R-N.C.), Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanHillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Maxine Waters says her committee will call in Zuckerberg to testify about Libra MORE (D-Calif.), Jim LangevinJames (Jim) R. LangevinRising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief Overnight Defense: Trump says he doesn't need exit strategy with Iran | McConnell open to vote on Iran war authorization | Senate panel advances bill to restrict emergency arms sales House passes bill to establish DHS cyber 'first responder' teams MORE (D-R.I.), and Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroTexas Democrats tap Joaquin Castro to deliver key address Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress Congressional Hispanic Caucus calls for answers on Mississippi ICE raids MORE (D-Texas) all signed on to support the bill.

One congressional aide told The Hill on Wednesday the legislation aims to codify the executive orders former President Obama issued in in 2015, as well as a revised version of the order made in 2016.

Obama issued the latest executive order in December 2016 in response to Russian interference during the presidential election.

The 2015 order, which applied to a broad range of activities a threat actor could carry out against the U.S., was not limited to a specific country.

It stated that the “increasing prevalence and severity of malicious cyber-enabled activities” serve as “an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States.”

Special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony Kellyanne Conway: 'I'd like to know' if Mueller read his own report MORE has charged 13 Russian individuals and three Russian groups with carrying out “information warfare” on social media platforms and by other sophisticated means to sow discord across all 50 states.

Trump followed suit in March, handing down sanctions against a handful of Russians for their cyber activity under the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act as well as Obama’s 2015 executive order.