House Intel lawmakers introduce bipartisan election security bill

House Intel lawmakers introduce bipartisan election security bill
© Greg Nash

Four lawmakers on the powerful House Intelligence Committee, including two Republicans, are introducing legislation to help states secure the nation's digital election infrastructure against cyberattacks following Russian interference in the 2016 election. 

The bill, which is a companion to a measure in the upper chamber spearheaded by Sens. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordSenate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks GOP senators eye 'nuclear' move to change rules on Trump nominees Senate GOP goes down to wire in showdown with Trump MORE (R-Okla.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHere's what the Dem candidates for president said about the Mueller report Booker takes early lead in 2020 endorsements Harris wants Barr to testify on Mueller report as 2020 Dems call for its release MORE (D-Minn.), is a direct response to the effort by Moscow’s hackers to target state websites and other systems involved in the electoral process in the run-up to the 2016 vote. 

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“Although the Russian government didn’t change the outcome of the 2016 election, they certainly interfered with the intention of sowing discord and undermining Americans’ faith in our democratic process,” said Rep. Tom RooneyThomas (Tom) Joseph RooneyHill-HarrisX poll: 76 percent oppose Trump pardoning former campaign aides Dems fear Trump is looking at presidential pardons Ex-GOP lawmaker joins family firm  MORE (R-Fla.) in a statement Friday.

“There’s no doubt in my mind they will continue to meddle in our elections this year and in the future.” 

According to the Department of Homeland Security, Russian hackers targeted election-related systems in 21 states before the 2016 vote. In a small number of cases, the hackers were actually successful in penetrating systems; Illinois saw its state voter registration breached, though officials say no data was altered or deleted. 

While officials say no actual voting machines were tampered with — experts say those would be much harder, if not impossible, for remote hackers to breach — the development has prompted widespread concerns and debate about the security of U.S. election infrastructure.

The Secure Elections Act, introduced by Reps. Rooney, Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyTop Republican releases full transcript of Bruce Ohr interview Gowdy calls congressional hearings like Cohen's 'utterly useless' The family secret Bruce Ohr told Rod Rosenstein about Russia case MORE (R-S.C.), Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesHillicon Valley: Doctors press tech to crack down on anti-vax content | Facebook, Instagram suffer widespread outages | Spotify hits Apple with antitrust complaint | FCC rejects calls to delay 5G auction House Dem introduces bill requiring public firms to disclose cybersecurity expertise in leadership House lawmakers clash over GOP allegations Dems coached Cohen MORE (D-Conn.) and Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellTo protect the vote, we must protect the courts Dems introduce bills to restore Voting Rights Act provision For a more perfect union, Restore the Voting Rights Act MORE (D-Ala.), would set up a voluntary grant program for states to replace outdated, paperless voting machines with those that provide a paper trail that can be audited in the event a result is called into question. 

The bill, like its companion in the Senate, is also designed to improve information sharing between state and federal officials on cyber threats to elections. It would codify into law many of the steps Homeland Security is already taking to share sensitive details on threats and award security clearances to state elections officials.

“Hostile foreign actors have attempted and will continue to attempt to undermine the fundamentals of our democracy by attacking our electoral process,” Gowdy said in a statement. “It is our responsibility to take every precaution necessary to safeguard our elections and ensure no vote count is ever interfered with.”

Lankford and Klobuchar led a bipartisan cadre of senators introducing the original version of the Secure Elections Act back in December. The senators have been working with state elections officials to adjust and improve the bill, introducing a revised version in March that picked up support from the leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

However, the development Friday is the first clear sign of the measure gaining traction in the House.

The issue of Russian interference has inflamed partisan divides in Washington as a result of the intelligence community’s conclusion that Moscow interfered in the election in part to help President TrumpDonald John TrumpMueller report findings could be a 'good day' for Trump, Dem senator says Trump officials heading to China for trade talks next week Showdown looms over Mueller report MORE win. Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee questioned that judgment in their final report on Russian interference, though some, like Gowdy, have broken with that finding. The Senate Intelligence Committee, meanwhile, has judged the intelligence community’s assessment as sound. 

Trump has railed against special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE’s investigation into Russian interference in the election, which includes examining whether there was collusion between his campaign and Moscow. 

Last month, Mueller indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers for breaching the Democratic National Committee and trying to hack into systems involved in the electoral process.

Congress has already taken some action to address election security, allocating $380 million for states to improve cybersecurity around their voting systems earlier this year. While Democrats have pushed to send more immediate money to state election officials, Republicans in both chambers have rejected those efforts.