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Dem introduces bill to create federal cybersecurity apprenticeship program

Dem introduces bill to create federal cybersecurity apprenticeship program
© Greg Nash

Rep. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenDems outraising Republicans in final stretch of midterms The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Pollsters: White college-educated women to decide if Dems capture House Obama to speak at campaign rally for Nevada Dems MORE (D-Nev.) on Thursday unveiled legislation to create a Department of Labor grant program for apprenticeships in cybersecurity.

The bipartisan bill, known as the “Cyber Ready Workforce Act,” would establish grants to help create, implement and expand registered apprenticeship programs for cybersecurity.

Under the bill, the programs would be required to offer certain cybersecurity certifications and help connect participants with local businesses or other entities for apprenticeships in hopes to boost the number of qualified workers for federal cyber jobs.

“The demand for talent in cybersecurity is sky-high, and we’re putting ourselves at risk if we don’t address this shortage in our workforce,” Rosen said in a statement Thursday. “I’m committed to ensuring that businesses and government have the skilled people and critical tools they need to enhance our nation’s cybersecurity infrastructure, help industry thrive, and strengthen our national security.”

Reps. Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonMellman: Why Kavanaugh should withdraw Senior Dem says Pelosi will be Speaker for as long as she wants Democrats opposed to Pelosi lack challenger to topple her MORE (D-Mass.), Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikCuomo: Driver in deadly limo crash did not have proper license Limo crash victims included family, friends going to birthday party at brewery Cook Political Report shifts 7 more races towards Dems MORE (R-N.Y.) and Dan Donovan (R-N.Y.) have all signed on as cosponsors to the legislation.

Cyber officials and experts have pointed to lack of qualified workers as a major detriment for cybersecurity. The bill cites the federally funded jobs heat map CyberSeek, which found that there are currently more than 300,000 open jobs in the cybersecurity field.

The proposed grant program is based on Nevada’s own cybersecurity apprenticeship program, the first in the country, according to a release from Rosen’s office.

Other lawmakers have also backed efforts to address the talent gap in cybersecurity: Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdElection Countdown: Dems outraise GOP in final stretch | 2018 midterms already most expensive in history | What to watch in second Cruz-O'Rourke debate | Trump raises 0M for reelection | Why Dems fear Avenatti's approach Dems struggle to mobilize Latino voters for midterms Election Countdown: Florida candidates face new test from hurricane | GOP optimistic about expanding Senate majority | Top-tier Dems start heading to Iowa | Bloomberg rejoins Dems | Trump heads to Pennsylvania rally MORE (R-Texas) has sought to create a “cyber national guard” to help recruit qualified workers.